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Post Info TOPIC: Williams-Janney hydraulic transmission


Legend

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Williams-Janney hydraulic transmission
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Was ratting through the IWM online image collection and came across two images which were captioned as a Mark IV tank

fitted with the Williams-Janney transmission and an uncaptioned third image of the rear of a Mark IV with a curious construction

added to the rear of the hull. Is this the external part of the Williams-Janney transmission?- it seems to have a header tank and radiator.

The 3 images are Q14562, Q14563, Q14564.

Charlie

The vehicle under the tarp in the background looks like the amphibious Mark IX. 

 



-- Edited by CharlieC on Sunday 18th of June 2017 11:54:44 PM

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Lieutenant-Colonel

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This is Mk.II as we can see by cabs's rivets location.

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Denis



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Have you also noted in the background a tank crane under a tarpaulin in the photo of the rear of the Mk II tank



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Craig Moore


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Legend

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Yes - I suspect the location was Dollis Hill in North London although it doesn't state the location in the IWM image captions.

The Welsh Harp (now Brent Reservoir) where the amphibious Mark IX was tested is pretty close to Dollis Hill.

Charlie



-- Edited by CharlieC on Monday 19th of June 2017 10:46:40 AM

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Corporal

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The apparatus in the third photo looks like a Ford Model T radiator, I assume for cooling the transmission (if it's the same tank).

jh



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jch


Legend

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The external radiator may have been a lash up since the transmission was found to generate excessive

amounts of heat.

Bit of research - strictly Williams and Janney developed and patented the variable pressure axial piston hydraulic pump.

The complete transmissions with hydraulic drive motors were produced by the Waterbury company.

Waterbury made turret actuator systems for the USN and Royal Navy before and during WW1.

The IWM has images of the rear of the Mark VII trial vehicle, also with the Williams-Janney transmission, but these haven't

been released to the Internet yet. It would be interesting to compare the arrangement of the Mark VII with the Mark II test vehicle.

 

Charlie

 



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Captain

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Charlie if you can find me the IWM reference number I will add it to the list of documents/photos I want to see next time I go to the IWM archives, for you.



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Craig Moore


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Legend

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Charlie

Where do you get the name Waterbury from? I can't find a company of this name. Do you have any more information about them?

Thanks

Gwyn

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Legend

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It is/was called Waterbury Tool Company based in Waterbury, CT.

Google found me a book on hydraulic engineering "Hydraulic Fluid Power - A Historical Timeline" by Steve Skinner available on lulu.com. 

I've attached screenshots of the relevant pages. The Royal Navy used hydraulic turret drives designed by Armstrongs but these used water

as the fluid - the American drives used oil as the fluid and seem to have been fairly compact. 

Stern called the drive the "Williams-Janney system" in his "Logbook of a Pioneer".

Charlie

 



-- Edited by CharlieC on Tuesday 20th of June 2017 03:08:18 AM

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Legend

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MooreTanks wrote:

Charlie if you can find me the IWM reference number I will add it to the list of documents/photos I want to see next time I go to the IWM archives, for you.


Thank you - the IWM search says there are 4 Mark VII images of interest

HU 64120

HU 64124

HU 64123

HU 64121

I think the trials were held in Scotland so the images may be of a tank in heavy rain or fog - the manufacturer Brown Brothers was based in Edinburgh.

It seems to me that I may have enough information for an article on the Mark VII tank for Landships II.

Regards,

Charlie

 



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Captain

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Charlie I have added them to the list of archive documents I want to look at. I will be going back there in the Autumn.



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Legend

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Thank you Charlie. This adds to my knowledge.

Gwyn



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Legend

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For anyone who would like to get their head around how the Williams-Janney transmission worked...

The principles are here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6FHU54qyRE

The Williams-Janney hydraulic pump had two cylinder blocks - one with a fixed swash plate

and one with a variable plate. The attached IWM image shows the pump disassembled. In this image the 

variable pump is on the left with the actuating cylinder to move the swashplate. The fixed part on the right

is missing the cylinder block but shows the pistons. On many applications such as turrets the fixed swashplate

assembly acted as the motor for the transmission. If this is so in the Mark VII tank there were probably two

of these units - one for each track.

I can see why the hydraulic transmission attracted a fair amount of interest. A gearless

infinitely variable transmission which gave steering control by simply varying the flows to the motors certainly

is an attractive proposition.

Charlie

 



-- Edited by CharlieC on Wednesday 21st of June 2017 07:01:22 AM



-- Edited by CharlieC on Wednesday 21st of June 2017 09:14:09 AM

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