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Post Info TOPIC: Couple of tank paintings for you...


Corporal

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Couple of tank paintings for you...
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I'm new to this forum and just wanted to say hi to all.
I'm an amateur artist from Finland, and my subjects include military history and passion to the Great War. My works can be found from my DeviantART-account:
http://patriatyrannus.deviantart.com
Here are couple of my tank-related pieces for you to view:

Not Leaving You Behind (acrylics 2009)
re-do of my old ink drawing, featuring a German soldier helping his wounded comrade in the face of an attack.

Ramming Through (acrylics 2009)
British Mk IV tank, C48 "Caesar" advancing on November the 20th 1917, during the battle of Cambrai.



-- Edited by Landsturm on Friday 30th of April 2010 08:58:08 AM

-- Edited by Landsturm on Friday 30th of April 2010 09:47:57 AM

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Brigadier

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These paintings are fantastic, I want more! :)

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Sorry for my bad English ;)


Commander in Chief

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Great pictures, Landsturm.

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General

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I really love these! Please do more!

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Lieutenant-Colonel

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Great works. I love them!


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Corporal

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Hughbearson wrote:

I really love these! Please do more!




Of course :) feel free to view my gallery for more of my artwork.
Assuming you specifically mean "do more tanks"? Is there some specific type, individual or situation in mind?

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Brigadier

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Landsturm wrote:

Hughbearson wrote:

I really love these! Please do more!




Of course :) feel free to view my gallery for more of my artwork.
Assuming you specifically mean "do more tanks"? Is there some specific type, individual or situation in mind?

Your gallery is really great! OK, so you've done two paintings with British tanks, how about German A7V tank or other tank/armoured car/armoured train of the Great War?

Or one of two fights between tanks in the Great War: Villers-Bretonneux (A7V vs Mark IVs, later A7V vs Whippets) or Niergnies/Seranvillers (8th October 1918, German Mark IVs vs British Mark IVs) w00t.gif

 



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Corporal

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I just might :) I'm always trying to view the war from several point of views and sides.
I have the Kenneth Macksey's "Tank versus Tank" in my bookself, which has good battle accounts and maps about those. But is there ONE specific idea you got? At the moment I have tons of work in my hands, but I'm always asking what people want to see, just don't hold your breath ;)

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Brigadier

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Landsturm wrote:

I just might :) I'm always trying to view the war from several point of views and sides.
I have the Kenneth Macksey's "Tank versus Tank" in my bookself, which has good battle accounts and maps about those. But is there ONE specific idea you got? At the moment I have tons of work in my hands, but I'm always asking what people want to see, just don't hold your breath ;)





I think that making a nice painting of a fight between two or more tanks is really hard so a single A7V (I just love these tanks) would be great for a beginning happy.gif

I didn't hear about "Tank versus Tank" book. Does it contain information on WWI battles? I guess that Villers-Bretonneux is covered, but I'm not so sure in case of much less known Niergnies/Seranvillers. Many people think that Villers-Bretonneux was the only tank vs tank fight of WW1.
 

  

 



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Legend

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The Villers-Bretonneux tank action was in 2 parts:

A7V #561 "Nixie" vs 3 Mk IVs
A7V #525 "Siegfried" vs 7 Whippets (4 Whippets destroyed by the A7V and 7.7cm guns)

The Niergnies/Seranvillers action was carried out by captured Mark IV tanks.

Regards,

Charlie


-- Edited by CharlieC on Sunday 2nd of May 2010 03:03:34 PM

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Brigadier

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CharlieC wrote:


The Villers-Bretonneux tank action was in 2 parts:

A7V #561 "Nixie" vs 3 Mk IVs
A7V #525 "Siegfried" vs 7 Whippets (4 Whippets destroyed by the A7V and 7.7cm guns)

Regards,

Charlie




Of course, I know, i wrote it in one of my previous posts in this topic happy.gif

 



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Corporal

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"Tank versus Tank" was very informative book and I hadn't heard about Niergnies before this. It contains a map, history and battle accounts starting from WW1, goes through WW2, Cold War and ending up in the near-future scenario (well, maybe a late 1990s) of armour vs. armour. I recommend it.

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General

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Personally, some Russian armoured cars would be interesting, but don't rush yourself.

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Corporal

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I'd like to see a painting of the Mk IVs as they first came into Nixe's veiw, or possibly A french heavy tank. And as everyone knows, A7Vs are welcome!



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Commander in Chief

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Hi Landstrum, when I 'forwarded' from Underground2 a threat warning came up a 1098 error what ever one of them is.

I better not Google deviantart don't know what i might find! biggrin

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ChrisG


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General

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LinkonTanker : DON'T use Deviantart. I used to be a(n active) member (I drew uniforms, but stopped since everyone else was too interested in anime), and found that whenever you searched something to do with history it either came up with something totally random and out of contex, or some kind of insult to both art and history in, once again, form of anime, as drawn by strange Japanese school girls. If you want real art, don't bother with Devart.furious

-- Edited by Hughbearson on Thursday 13th of May 2010 07:56:24 PM

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Corporal

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DA is not without its flaws, but I've find it useful for presenting my works and also receiving some good critique. I agree with you, but I'm not interested in anime and I ignore them, as well as all the other styles, genres, influences and groups that I'm not interested in.

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General

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Though, on Deviantart, you will like this

http://angusmcleod.deviantart.com/art/World-War-One-Simple-Version-128505446


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Corporal

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German A7V, number 528 named "Hagen" was one of the vehicles accidentaly hit by friendly artillery fire near Frémicourt, August 31st 1918.



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Brigadier

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Landsturm wrote:

German A7V, number 528 named "Hagen" was one of the vehicles accidentaly hit by friendly artillery fire near Frémicourt, August 31st 1918.



Yes! A7V at last! It was worth waiting all these months! Great job! worship.gif

 



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Legend

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More great work indeed.  The whole gallery is great, and much of it captures the emotional aspect which is a fitting tribute to those who fought - and those who died.  "Lest we forget."

Back to topics - one thing that has haunted me ever since I read it (somewhere, I can't find it again), that at (such-and-such) a battle, the Germans first used the tactic of firing flares at the tanks in the fog, to mark them for artillery attention.  What a surreal scene - I haven't seen it pictuered anywhere, but it would be difficult to portray.  Perhaps other forum members know, or have an idea, which battle that might have been and which formations might have been targeted that way?

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Corporal

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Forgot about this forum biggrin I started a new series of paintings on the subject.

 

In the middle of the battle of the Somme, September 15th 1916 marks the first use of "tank" in warfare.
 
Here, a British Mark I tank C5 "Crème de Menthe" arrives to support the Canadian troops near the Sugar Factory on their way to Courcelette.
Out of the six tanks operating here, only C5 (despite the broken steering tail wheel) and C6 managed to get to their objective and back. The others broke down or got stuck in the no-man's land.

 



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Corporal

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the First World War saw a great number of different armoured cars, before and after the first tanks appeared in the battlefield. Here are just a few examples used;

Top left: Belgian Minerva car patrolling on the outskirts of a German occupied town, August 1914.
Top right: British Rolls-Royce Mk I, in Egypt, 1916. The upper panels of the armour has been removed from the turret, as it was often the case in desert regions.
Lower left: After the war, German E-V/4 Panzerkraftwagen Ehrhardt being used by the Freikorps in Berlin, during the uprising January 1919.
Lower right: Russians decided to produce a domestic version on the chassis of British Austin. Due the revolution of 1917, the "Russian Austins" didn't quite make it to the WW1. But it was extensively used in the following Civil War and the related conflicts, especially by the Reds. This car became known as Austin-Putilov.



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Corporal

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the first French tanks at the beginning of the disasterous "Nivelle Offensive", April 16th 1917.

Schneider CA1 tanks of the Groupement Chaubès have reached the German frontline and are being mauled by the enemy artillery. The machines were unable to cross the purposely widened trenches and many didn't even manage to pass the their own trench line! The later photographs show a graveyard of tanks in front of "Tranchée de la Plaine".
Further east, near Berry-au-Bac another strike was made by Groupement Bossut, between Aisne and Miette. Despite casualties, some tanks managed to push some 5 km behind the German lines.

The individual tank in the foreground is number 61057 (from Groupe Artillerie Spéciale 3) and was commanded by Sous-lieutenant Payotte. The vehicle was among those destroyed during the day.



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Corporal

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Mark tanks in both desolate quagmire and open country in the Western Front.

Top inset: Female version of Mark II C21, 578 named "Perfect Lady" during the Arras offensive. This particular tank had ditched before reaching the British frontline on the opening of the attack on 9th April 1917. It was in action once again two days later, but it's destiny was to be knocked out by a friendly artillery barrage in Monchy-Le-Preux, on 11th April.
Although considered a British "victory", the Arras offensive (together with the ill-fated French offensive at the same time) didn't achieve a breakthrough and resulted high casualties.

The year 1918, saw the armoured warfare at its best. In the foreground, Mark V B56, 9003 of the (C Coy, 2 Battalion, Tank Corps), while advancing in support of the Australian troops in Amiens, 8th August 1918.
This was the start of a final Allied offensive and the opening day led Ludendorff to name it "the black day of the German Army".   
This battle was also the debut of a lengthened model, Mark V*, that can be seen in the background accompanied with infantry.



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Corporal

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the Mark IV was the most produced British tank of the war. Introduced in early summer 1917, they were used in the famous battle of Cambrai, later that year. But before that, they were also deployed in the notorious Third battle of Ypres.

Depicted is one remarkable incident. On 22nd August 1917, tanks of 18th Company (F Battalion) were making an attack against series of fortified farm buildings. After engaging the enemy positions named "Somme Farm" and "Gallipoli", one individual F41 "Fray Bentos" stumbled into a shellhole and got stuck in the mud. And, as we now, mud was sort of the "thing" of Third Ypres.
The tank remained ditched in no-man's land, with casualties, under fire from both sides and fighting off three German counter-attacks until the crew abandoned the tank and managed to get back to their own lines on the night of the 24th.
The remaining crew received several awards for this action. The commander, Captain Richardson (now a recipient of a Military Cross) would fight later at the Battle of Cambrai, in a tank named "Fray Bentos II". This vehicle was also put out of action and captured by the Germans. Richardson's son was killed while serving in the Royal Tank Regiment, at El Alamein 1942.

 

That's what I have so far. I'll add more over time...



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Brigadier

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Fantastic! :) Keep up the great work! :)

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Lieutenant

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Really great work, I look forward to seeing more.

John

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Corporal

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New stuff...

As their Spring offensives continued onto early summer, Germans launched "Operation Gneisenau" against the French and Americans, in June 9th 1918. In Compiègne, the French (under General Mangin) started their counter-attack with four divisions and 160 tanks, surprising the Germans and eventually stopping their offensive.

S
een here, two French Saint-Chamond tanks (improved version) are spearheading the counter-attack from Méry, June 11th 1918.
The
62668 ”Pas Kamarad” (from 2° Batterie, Groupe Artillerie Spéciale 38) broke down and was captured by the enemy in the town Lataule.



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Corporal

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Medium Mark A Whippet medium tanks in action, Frémicourt August 29th 1918.

Section of Whippets from 3rd Battalion (Tank Corps) was tasked to aid the New Zealand Division against the German machineguns east of Bapaume. While under intense fire, one tank (A233) slipped into a shell hole and caught fire, trapping the crew inside. Lieutenant Cecil Sewell, commanding A259 "Caesar II", stopped his tank and ran out across open ground under enemy fire and managed to rescue the crew. After this, while attending to his own wounded driver, Lt. Sewell and his gunner were both killed. For this action, Lt. Sewell was awarded posthumous Victoria Cross.



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