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Post Info TOPIC: MACK AC "BULLDOG"


Colonel

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MACK AC "BULLDOG"
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Hello,

Following a question from Rob (Mar 29 2009):
I bought the MACK AC 'BULLDOG" (all RPM) Typ HC 3 (early), Typ EHC (late) and Typ TK3 (late), I suppose last two were never active on the Western front during WW1:

They say a lot of the MACK lorries were used on the Western front in France (about 2000 by British Army) but for the moment I have not found any pictures of this vehicles (exempt civilian Pic's or vehicles in US) used in frontline or behind (find it strange, was maybe a "secret weapon" smile .
I asked some information concerning the MACK used by British Troops straight
to the "MACK museum" but they couldn't give an answer because they don't have any information about vehicles used by other countries once delivered to US Army.
The same question I asked to the Imperial War Museum and they told I'm somewhere on a waiting list.  
Concerning last two vehicles (EHC and TK3): where were they used, did they were used in some conflict (war).

Tks for any information

DJ

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Legend

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That is annoying. I have seen some pics of Macks in the last couple of days but can't remember where. There's a glimpse of one amongst the photos in Treat 'Em Rough!

Maybe Mr. Mroz can be of some use after all. Try here.

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Commander in Chief

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Wow! never knew of this book. And this picture sure would make a great diorama theme! No more Ft 17s on Macks!


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Colonel

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Hello,

Somewhere on the web I found some Pic's (not really WW 1) 
and maybe known by some of You.

DJ

ac_ap_military_6628.jpg
ac_ap_military_6627.jpg

ac_ap_military_6626.jpg

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Legend

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Hi the link doesnt work this one should...

http://www.trucksplanet.com/catalog/model.php?id=482

I think they may all be postwar, US trucks are not a problem to find theres plenty of pics but despite the 2000 or so that are said to have been supplied to the british Ive never seen a pic... nor a french one either...

wierd after Iposted the link the pics have shown up...


Cheerswink

-- Edited by Ironsides on Friday 18th of March 2011 06:57:33 PM

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Rob


Legend

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Blimey! Wonder what size engine the searchlight lorry has

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Commander in Chief

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I'm pleased The Mack's gone off topic as I came across this post war 'Pole Road' Mack, and a model of a Rail Mack, interesting enough to share.

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ChrisG


The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity (Dorothy Parker)


Colonel

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You raise a very interesting point. If there were a couple of thousand macks in WD service then why are pictures of them so hard to find? It would seem that even Bart Vanderveen couldnt find any for his Army vehicles Directory. There is no mention of Macks whatsoever in the ASC documents i have and it is strange that no more references to them can be found. It also then questions the whole theory that the British referred to them as "Bulldogs" which gave them their nickname. All very strange.

Tim

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Rob


Legend

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Matador Models lists one of their Bulldog's as having a GS Body, which I presumed refers to the British General Service Body;

http://matadormodels.co.uk/gw/lists%20GWV.htm

Which is presumably based on some truth somewhere

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Colonel

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Tks all of You, If all the "veterans" of this forum don't find a Pic, I think British or American Troops didn't take pictures because they found the vehicle was an " ugly duck" instead of a "Bulldog" :)

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Colonel

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Hi Folks,

Yesterday I received an answer of Mr Dale R. Güth of the MACK Customer Center in Allentown, Philadelphia (US).

Post included 3 catalogues:
MACK Trucking among the clouds 1916-1917 (58 Pages)
MACK AC Trucks (53 Pages)
(MACK AC 3 1/2, 5, 6 1/2 and 7 1/2 Tons (55 Pages)
and
Some chassis registers dated 1917

Catalogues includes construction plans of AC Trucks and Tractors (=the one used for the Submarine) and some nice photo's of different types (mostly civilian).
 Also detailled description of Engine and Chassis (opening of the doors,  description of driver compartiment, ...)

As it is to big to scan and put it on on this site I propose that if someone is interested in some items, he send me a mail with the items he likes to have, I send them to his Email adress.

If  other suggestions to put them visible (on this site) to all (I'm NOT a computer nerd), tell me.

Nice evening,

DJ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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Sergeant

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Hi there.

I'm facing the same problem. I bought a couple of RPM's Macks, that I want to put on a small diorama about the Meuse-Argonne offensive. I didn't find any pics of these trucks, even in US service during 1918... Quite strange for such a workhorse... I did found a couple images of american trucks during this operation, but I'm not sure, or at least not able to find if they are Macks. There's a row of trucks behind the ambulances at 00:36, and the truck at 00:58 seems to be a Liberty...

http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65675067792_Meuse-Argonne-Offensive_troops-advance_machines-guns-loaded_troops-wait-in-trenches

I'm keepin' on searching, but if anyone as pictures of these trucks in US Service in France during 1918, these would be warmly welcome.

Chris.



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Commander in Chief

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I know it's not about a wartime Mack, but I think you'll get very useful ideas out of this build... in carboard!

http://www.kartonwork.pl/forum/viewtopic.php?t=6302&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0&sid=25e91fb6a4d0ca45e73c4aaba701fc03

Mack truck



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Colonel

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Evening,

I'm still searching to, I think we shouldn't look to the troops at the front but more (far) behind the frontline and dated after 11 Nov 1918 (so after end of war).

There were at least two engineer  (US) units active in France (10th and 20th Forestry Engineers) during WW1 (???) (See link below).

http://www.foresthistory.org/research/WWI_ForestryEngineers.htm

Do Americans maybe have for some reason,  another date for the end of WW1 because most sites tell the vehicles were used during WW1 but Pics are from later date (1919, even later)

DJ



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Legend

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As I was reminded a while ago by James H, officially the war ended on the 28th june 1919 bettween Germany and the Allies, American units would presumably still have been on a war footing up untill that point, reading some the unit historys makes this a bit clearer...

Cheerswink



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Sergeant

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Hi ! Found one pic... Traffic Jam in Argonne, 1918... The Mack seem to carry loads of wood planks... Chris.

 



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Argonne 1918.bmp (133.5 kb)
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Legend

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Well done heres an enhanced image..

Cheerswink



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Colonel

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Correct, have watched the picture a few times but never pay attention to the details of the picture (Sign on the nose of the vehicle)

 

DJ



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Colonel

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Goodevening,

Got an answer from the Imperial War Museum: No information, but the links seem intresting for further search concerning WW1 and other history facts:

 

Imperial War Museum
Collections Enquiry Service

Response to your question with Question #: IWM154229

Our response is:
I am sorry to say that a search of our collection of published items has failed to locate any references which would be of assistance to you. The only source of detailed information will, I believe, be the original War Office archive material held at The National Archives, Ruskin Avenue, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Although The National Archives offer a limited number of what they call 'paid searches' of specific areas of their collection, it is frequently still necessary to visit in person (having first arranged to have a reader's ticket issued) or else to employ a professional researcher to visit for you. Details of the latter, together with the current range of paid searches which The National Archives staff are prepared to undertake, may be obtained from the Reader Information Services Department at Kew. The address for The National Archives website is

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk.
The idea of our collections holdings can be gained at
http://www.iwmcollections.org.uk/qryMain.php.


All our publications, documents and sound files can be consulted in the IWM Research Room. It is open to the public by prior appointment from Monday to Friday, 10.00am to 5.00pm, and no readers tickets or other forms of identification are required.
If you wish to visit the Research Room simply let us know by email at collections@iwm.org.uk or by telephone on (020) 7416-5342 when you have a particular date in mind, at least two working days in advance in the case of an email appointment, or one working day if the appointment is made by telephone.
Till June 2011 our building will be undergoing extensive refurbishment intended to provide us with state-of-the-art storage and research facilities. Unfortunately this work means that large parts of the Library collection (sound archive and documents are not affected) will be unavailable during this period. Visitors with appointments will still be able to use our Reading Room, but should bear in mind that
Yours sincerely
Mariusz Gasior
Access Team Librarian

DJ

 



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Rob


Legend

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One option could be to go to the IWM photo collections and just sit there and sift through the books of photographs - they're fairly well indexed as well which may help - I once spent an afternoon trying to find British Ford model T images and found dozens of them which i'd never seen before

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Lieutenant-Colonel

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If you've not posted those images of Model T Fords on the site already, we'd love to see tham. . .

 

BosunAl



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HJK


Private

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Hi Tankcommander,

I'd like to inform you that I would be interested to receive the catalogues you got from Dale of the Mack Customer Center in Allentown.

Please tell me which would be the best way to get together.

Juergen



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