Landships II

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Post Info TOPIC: History of Wisbech park


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History of Wisbech park
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"Part of the park was originally in the parish of Walsoken.  This was known as Marsh Fields and owned by the Church Commissioners.  It was rented out as market garden land and grazing". 

1919
"Came the tank, another feature in the park and given to the town in recognition of its war savings during the First World War.  It was called “Kaloma”.  It came by rail to the harbour line which ran along the side of the park. This was placed in the centre of the park and was fenced round.  This plinth can still be seen on which it was placed.  A Horace Friend bought the tank as scrap to aid the war effort of WW2 for £50 and scrapped in 1940".

KALOMA.jpgK2.jpgK3.jpg



-- Edited by Valeriy67 on Wednesday 30th of April 2014 08:57:29 AM

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Legend

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Very nice, Valeriy. Where did you find that? Wisbech is a long way from  Russia.

Has anyone googled "Kaloma"?



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Legend

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Kaloma was a WW1 pin-up, though I'm not an expert on such things...

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Legend

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Gwyn appears to be correct, although to be charitable to our lusty forebears one might imagine it was enthusiasm for Goulineaux' Valse Hésitante in the trenches that was the real source of her popular acclaim.  But ah, brush aside the peignoir (figuratively) and there is much to be learned from more recent attempts to put a baptismal name to the lady.  I am thinking of The SAGE Handbook of Visual Research Methods (editors Eric Margolis and Luc Pauwels, 2011) which devotes some pages - those numbered 345 through to 348 at least - to the question, only to conclude '...at this point there is little evidence, some interpretation loosely based on that evidence, and much speculation about the subject of the image known as Kaloma,' specifically that the picture might be an earlier (long before 1914) happy snap of Tombstone's own lawman's missus, yclept Josephine Sarah Marcus ("Sadie Earp").  Nevertheless, the Handbook might be of some interest to those whose researches/collections involve images, particularly those who pay for those images. Prints of Kaloma have sold for thousands of dollars based mostly on doubtful identification of the sitter.  Or beguiling stander in this case.



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Legend

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Not the sort of thing to have on display in a public park, you'd have thought. Perhaps the City Fathers were ignorant - after all, they didn't have Google, or so I'm told.

Gwyn

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Legend

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Gwyn Evans wrote:

Not the sort of thing to have on display in a public park, you'd have thought. Perhaps the City Fathers were ignorant - after all, they didn't have Google, or so I'm told.

Gwyn


 According to Wikipedia, they did.



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Legend

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biggrin  Have I mentioned before that infinity, being indivisible, means that there's no "eventually" in the simian production of Shakespeare's works?  They would achieve it the first time (an infinite number of copies).  Also an infinite number of times on the second drafts. Also an infinite number of times with errors, greater or smaller in all drafts.  That's infinity (or eternity) for you.

But, something completely different, since the first "mainstream" outing of the Kaloma image (1914) appears to be on the cover of the score for Goulineaux' waltz and presumably did much to spread its popularity amongst the French and British male population (not to mention American since it was published in New York), is it not amusing that the composer was actually German?  Johann Christoph Schmid was his real name.

 



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Legend

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James H wrote:
Gwyn Evans wrote:

Not the sort of thing to have on display in a public park, you'd have thought. Perhaps the City Fathers were ignorant - after all, they didn't have Google, or so I'm told.

Gwyn


 According to Wikipedia, they did.


 Oops - silly mistake for me to make. Serves me right for not looking at a reliable source...



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