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Post Info TOPIC: WW1 British motorcade


Hero

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WW1 British motorcade
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Here's some interesting footage, amd promse for even more interesting photos: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11438006 I'm not too skillful at deciphering the Kiwi strine, though... D.

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Legend

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Thanks for the link Diego!

Just a minor point (Kiwi accent), the interviewer is a Kiwi, but the guy doing most of the talking has an English accent. I can't identify the region - but home counties for sure.

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Legend

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Rectalgia wrote:

Thanks for the link Diego!

Just a minor point (Kiwi accent), the interviewer is a Kiwi, but the guy doing most of the talking has an English accent. I can't identify the region - but home counties for sure.


 The guy doing most of the talking also has a New Zealand accent - it's the old accent of educated kiwis before everyone in New Zealand started speaking like agricultural labourers.

I used to sound like that before I moved to Australia and had to debase my accent so the locals could understand me. 

Regards,

Charlie



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Legend

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Good lord - thanks for the correction Charlie :) Educated Australians used to sound like Oxford dons (or educated Scots at least) - but they overcame the cultural cringe and started talking like themselves. They've probably taken it too far now, but then even the Queen's accent has "debased" over the years, some say.

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Legend

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Gentlemen,

A little off-topic, but this does interest me greatly.

I must admit to some scepticism about the Home Counties accent. Sounded distinctly antipodean to me, unless he was a £10 Pom.

Until recently, we had both an Aussie and a Kiwi living next door to each other on our row, but I never managed to get them to explain the subtleties of the differences between the two accents. As a sort of amateur linguist, I wonder if Stephen and Charlie might spare a few moments to give us some examples of what to look for.

I did hear a joke about how to tell the difference, but it was most unseemly, and I shall not repeat it here.



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Legend

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Ah, it is in the vowels ("common speach" anyway) - the famous six/sux, bin/bun, have/hev. Turns of phrase are a litttle different too - "esky"/"chilly bin". We all sound English to the Americans but I met numerous folk in Chile and Mexico who swore they could tell the difference, though possibly not specifically between Australian/New Zealander/Rhodesian/South African - some of which sound more British than the Brits to my ear.

You would love the Oxford An Atlas of English Dialects by Clive Upton and J.D.A. Widdowson - but that covers only England

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Legend

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Agreed it's mostly the vowel sounds. As with English/English there are are regional and class/education differences but they are nowhere as sharp as

the English dialect differences. For example working class people from New South Wales still mangle "i" sounds - to my ear becomes a flat "e" sound ("Phil" becomes "Feel").

I had a mate in NZ called Phil - he had an Ozzie girlfriend from Sydney - we always said it was impossible to know whether she was naming him or giving an invitation.

Another NSW trait is an upward inflexion at the end of a sentence. It sounds like they are asking a question which they aren't - women especially do this.

To my ear the current NZ accent sounds as if the vowel sounds have been borrowed from Maori - the "i" sounds becoming "u" is really strange - "fush and chups" indeed.

We have a lots of "Suth Effricuns" in Australia - at least I think that's what they call themselves.

I remember you used to be able pick people from Southland in New Zealand - they had a Scottish intonation in their speech. Apparently Dunedin and Invercargill were settlements

created by the Presbyterian Church. Christchurch was a Church of England settlement - when I was young people from ChCh had noticeably English middle class accents even

more so than the guy on the video that started this thread.

Regards,

Charlie



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Legend

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Gentlemen, thank you.

The 'fesh' thing confirms what the memsahib has told me. She worked for a number of years for the ICRC, where she met and studied many antipodeans. Again, I confess to some initial doubts about her claim, but it seems she is right on this occasion. As on every other, of course.

It sounds fascinating, and I must find some audio examples. Just as, here, in South Yorkshire they drink chicken nodal soap, whilst in East Yorkshire they prefer a curled kirk.

Thank you for your time, and to Landships for the bandwidth or whatever it is.

FYI, the punchline is: "And the Australian says, 'A fourteen year old what?'"



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Legend

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James H wrote:
...I must find some audio examples. ...

 Well, using the search term youtube beached az, you could make a start ...

Incidentally, whenever I hear an Englishman tying to say "mate" in Strine, it inevitably comes out as "mite" to my ear.  I'm sure the R&R areas in WW1 resounded with it.  Mind you, accents change quite noticeably in much less than a lifetime.  And as Charlie alludes, there are male and female differences, the female being the more volatile I fancy (no doubt due to greater exercise).



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Brigadier

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So Mite, heading back on to topic. How many vehicles can you identify in that cavalcade.

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Legend

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Great War Truck wrote:

So Mite, heading back on to topic. How many vehicles can you identify in that cavalcade.


Not quite - in bogan it's - "maate" or "mayte" (should give James an interesting term to explore).

Regards,

Charlie



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Legend

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OK, no more frivolity for the time being.

There's a nice long and closer range vid here: 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=eSlzc1u8Lbc

There's an AA gun, presumably on a Thornycroft, and a narrow-bodied lorry that might be a Jeffery Mortar Carrier. Someone with better eyesight and more knowledge will spot more.

The buses vary considerably in detail, and I'd have to dig my books out to get at the info, but for some reason they all have the "lightweight" brackets supporting the canopy above the driver, which were far less common than the solid ones as seen on the B Types in the IWM & London Transport Museum.

That's the best I can do at present.

And I think PJ's Mk IV was involved at some point.

 



-- Edited by James H on Thursday 30th of April 2015 01:19:29 PM

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Corporal

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I don't believe any of the buses are 'real'. I think they are replicas, possibly built for a film?  AfaIk there are only 3 surviving 'B type' buses, B43, B214 & B340. B43 'Ole Bill' is in the IWM & B340 is in the LT collection. 214 could possibly be in NZ but none of them looked real.

mike



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Major

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Real historical vehicles it seems, all part of filmmaker Peter Jackson's private collection.

Heres a better look at all the vehicles involved:
www.youtube.com/watch



-- Edited by airdave on Wednesday 21st of October 2015 03:09:18 PM

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Brigadier

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citroenboat wrote:

I don't believe any of the buses are 'real'. I think they are replicas, possibly built for a film?  AfaIk there are only 3 surviving 'B type' buses, B43, B214 & B340. B43 'Ole Bill' is in the IWM & B340 is in the LT collection. 214 could possibly be in NZ but none of them looked real.

mike


You are right. The buses are all very crude film props but built on a mixture of period chassis and fitted with modern drive train.

There are four surviving LGOC B Types in the UK. IWM, 2 X LT and one in private ownership which made its debut this year.

Tim



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Corporal

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Cheers Tim
Any idea of the 'B' number of the private one?
Thanks
mike

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Brigadier

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Yes. B1609. I don't think it saw any military service.

 



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