Landships II

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Rather mysterious Armoured Car/Railcar...


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 209
Date:
Rather mysterious Armoured Car/Railcar...
Permalink   


Al Mafrak / Palestina 1918

 

 

 

 

Polizei Abt. Weissenfels 1920

 

 

Cheers, Peter



__________________

"Siplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-



Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 3274
Date:
Permalink   

I knew this rang a bell.

http://landships.activeboard.com/t27952741/armoured-lorry/

It's OK, Peter. I do it a lot nowadays.



__________________

"Sometime things that are not true are included in Wikipedia. While at first glance that may appear like a very great problem for Wikipedia, in reality is it not. In fact, it's a good thing." - Wikipedia.



Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 209
Date:
Permalink   

Hi James

Actually I just wanted to share the new pic with the community. I knew that I had postet them already once before, but I couldn't detect that thread again ...       Such things increase with age crycrycry

Thanks anyway!

 

 



__________________

"Siplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-



Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 209
Date:
Permalink   

I think, this one is new ...wink

 Erhardt Panzerwagen [Ehrhardt-Werke Zella St. Blasii]



__________________

"Siplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-



Commander in Chief

Status: Offline
Posts: 577
Date:
Permalink   

Not really. It's on display in the Ehrhardt corner of the industrial museum in Zella St. Blasii. But from the code accompanying the picture I'd say the museum staff is not aware that the image has been 'borrowed' by some East European gentlemen.



__________________
MZ
Rob


Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 1328
Date:
Permalink   

Wow, an armoured car with a tiled roof! Very nice...

__________________

http://www.flickr.com/photos/roblangham



Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 3274
Date:
Permalink   

Here's the link to the museum.

I might be wrong, but looks as if the gents in picture 2 above are two Australian officers, a French officer, and an Arab, all very well dressed and apparently a long way from the battlefield. That would imply that the vehicle was captured at some point. If so, when and, in view of the smartness of the men, in what circumstances?

 



__________________

"Sometime things that are not true are included in Wikipedia. While at first glance that may appear like a very great problem for Wikipedia, in reality is it not. In fact, it's a good thing." - Wikipedia.



Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 1647
Date:
Permalink   

 

Anyone else notice the different numbers on the Ottoman railcars. The number is above the centre MG position. The railcar

with the Central powers troops has the number "2" and the captured one "4". I don't what the Osmanli script says on the railcar

(but probably can find out). Might suggest there were a number of these railcars in Turkey and Palestine.

Syria 1918-19 comes to mind as a place where you would have found Australians, French and Arabs.

Regards,

Charlie

 



-- Edited by CharlieC on Sunday 8th of November 2015 01:56:18 AM

__________________


Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 3274
Date:
Permalink   

Smart work, Charles. My travails in Riyadh should have helped me there. The similarity between how the Arabs write 6 and we write 7* sometimes caused me to catch the wrong bus if I wasn't concentrating. The blurb on the museum site doesn't cover this aspect, but Syria is an excellent shout. Tally-ho!

* That requires careful explanation, because we call our numbers Arabic (i.e. not Roman) since we adopted them from Arabic. The numbers that the Arabs now use are not Arabic but, I was told, of Indian origin. Oh, and their 5 looks like our 0. And their 0 is a dot.



__________________

"Sometime things that are not true are included in Wikipedia. While at first glance that may appear like a very great problem for Wikipedia, in reality is it not. In fact, it's a good thing." - Wikipedia.



Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 1647
Date:
Permalink   

 

Making the Arabic numbers explicit:

٠١٢ ٣ ٤ ٥ ٦ ٧ ٨ ٩
 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

The origin of number symbols is complex but I've  seen it expressed that Western numbers are copied 

from West Arabic dialects and modern Arabic numbers are derived from East Arabic dialects. Both sets of number symbols have their roots in India.

Regards,

Charlie

 

Thinking about it - probably a shame we didn't stick to Roman numerals - there's something so definite and concrete about a number system you can chisel

in stone easily. There's no particular difficulty in using Roman numerals - Claude Shannon built a roman numeral calculator back in 1953 called "Throbac I"

 

 



-- Edited by CharlieC on Sunday 8th of November 2015 03:02:13 AM



-- Edited by CharlieC on Sunday 8th of November 2015 11:47:33 AM

Attachments
__________________


Sergeant

Status: Offline
Posts: 42
Date:
Permalink   

Turkish-armoured-rail-car-1918.JPG

Hi all. Next photo.Yours.



__________________


Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 3274
Date:
Permalink   

Here's the caption for Photo No. 2  

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/B02552/

 

 

Apologies to antipodean friends.

 

 

Kamo200's photo seems to have been taken in or near Amman.



__________________

"Sometime things that are not true are included in Wikipedia. While at first glance that may appear like a very great problem for Wikipedia, in reality is it not. In fact, it's a good thing." - Wikipedia.



Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 1647
Date:
Permalink   

Oh dear - the AWM has been using work experience people to do its captions (again).

Best guess the railcar was captured at Mafraq - a railway station about halfway between Amman and Dera.

Having misidentified the railcar as a truck - the statement "Note the railway line under the truck"  sounds like

missing the bleeding obvious to me.

Regards,

Charlie



-- Edited by CharlieC on Monday 9th of November 2015 03:33:18 AM

__________________


Sergeant

Status: Offline
Posts: 42
Date:
Permalink   

367_001.jpg

Thanks James H.  French improvised armored train in Syria. Photo from: P.Malmassari "Les trains blindes 1826-1989"



Attachments
__________________


Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 3274
Date:
Permalink   

On the Damascus-Rayak railway line, during the Syria Druze revolt, acc to a source. Would love to know more about the vehicles, but can't find anything so far.



__________________

"Sometime things that are not true are included in Wikipedia. While at first glance that may appear like a very great problem for Wikipedia, in reality is it not. In fact, it's a good thing." - Wikipedia.



Sergeant

Status: Offline
Posts: 42
Date:
Permalink   

0ed6873a8384.jpg

Photos of Heigl. I would also like to know more, maybe in the future ..



Attachments
__________________


Brigadier

Status: Offline
Posts: 259
Date:
Permalink   

CharlieC wrote:

 

Making the Arabic numbers explicit:

٠١٢ ٣ ٤ ٥ ٦ ٧ ٨ ٩
 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

 

 
I was very interested to see this post. Here is a WD truck licence plate from the same time

I always assumed that it might have been in Mespot, but could have been Palestine I presume?

Thanks

Tim


 



__________________


Sergeant

Status: Offline
Posts: 42
Date:
Permalink   

Pz - Kopia.jpg             Next photo. Yours.



Attachments
__________________


Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 3274
Date:
Permalink   

I'm out.



__________________

"Sometime things that are not true are included in Wikipedia. While at first glance that may appear like a very great problem for Wikipedia, in reality is it not. In fact, it's a good thing." - Wikipedia.



Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 1647
Date:
Permalink   

The inscription on the railcar translates as:

Hicaz demiryolu ( uloyrimed zaciH)
Hedjaz railway

Thanks to Tosun Saral on the Axis History forum.

Regards,

Charlie

 



-- Edited by CharlieC on Sunday 20th of December 2015 12:32:17 AM

__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us