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Post Info TOPIC: Peruvian 8 inch (203 mm) Schneider Howitzers??


Colonel

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Peruvian 8 inch (203 mm) Schneider Howitzers??
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According to Spanish sources (pre WW1) Peru ordered a battery of these Schneider 203 mm howitzers "that is in service" (that is operational)   In Peru. The :Battery" consisted  of four railway cars, and a locomotive.: one car for ammunition. another for the gun crews and two cars, each carrying a 203 mm Howitzers.etc, etc and gives full specs.However, none of the U.S. Military Attaché Reports in Peru in my files  mentions these weapons.

A French source informs me that they were never delivered, as they were confiscated and turned over to the French Army in 1914..

Does anyone have any further details the subject?

 ][/UR

 


-- Edited by Brunner88 on Sunday 12th of February 2017 05:07:53 AM



-- Edited by Brunner88 on Sunday 12th of February 2017 05:09:36 AM

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Sergeant

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203-mm? Not 200-mm howitzers?

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Legend

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The book "Les Canons de la Victoire  1914-18" Tome 2 has an entry for the Peruvian 200mm L/15 howitzers. Two were ordered as mobile coastal defence

guns intended for the protection of the River Rimac mouth. Both guns were requisitioned from the Schneider works in October 1914

Regards,

Charlie

 



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MLW


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The two howitzers with ammunition car and an observation car (with telescoping periscope) were requisitioned from Schneider by the French Army and then organized them into the 51e batterie du 1er Régiment d'Artillerie à Pied. The guns went into action in October 1914 in Flanders and were the first railway guns put into action during the war.



-- Edited by MLW on Sunday 12th of February 2017 01:22:04 PM

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Regards, Marc

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Colonel

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That's is what I thought!-hence the U.S. G2 reports were correct. Now, there were two Schneider Cannet 24 cm guns at Lima ( El Callao? Do you have any details on these..?

Regards

Gunther



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Colonel

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MLW wrote:

The two howitzers with ammunition car and an observation car (with telescoping periscope) were requisitioned from Schneider by the French Army and then organized them into the 51e batterie du 1er Régiment d'Artillerie à Pied. The guns went into action in October 1914 in Flanders and were the first railway guns put into action during the war.



-- Edited by MLW on Sunday 12th of February 2017 01:22:04 PM


 That's is what I  thought-reinforced by what my friend in Toulouse maintained! thanks! 51e batterie du 1er Régiment d'Artillerie à Pied d'Artillerie à Pied.That's is an odd designation for a battery of mobile artillery. Was the locomotive requisitoned by the French Army as well? and another question; was the Schneider locomotive of the Decauville gauge?



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Colonel

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kapitan wrote:

203-mm? Not 200-mm howitzers?


Good question! The article refers to them as "200 mm" but isn't this a generic  rather than an actual  designation?



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MLW


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The two howitzers were used to equip a foot artillery battery because there were no railway artillery batteries (ALVF) yet. The howitzers were 200mm caliber which was an oddity because the French Army, or any European army for that matter, used 200mm caliber guns. That meant specially manufactured rounds were required.

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Legend

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Brunner88 wrote:

That's is what I thought!-hence the U.S. G2 reports were correct. Now, there were two Schneider Cannet 24 cm guns at Lima ( El Callao? Do you have any details on these..?

Regards

Gunther


 Same reference as before...

In 1906 6 24cm L/45 coastal defence guns were ordered by Peru. In 1914, two mounts and 3 barrels were at Cruesot. The two mounts were requisitioned and installed at Verdun in a counter-battery role. Both guns were captured by the Germans in February 1916. 

Charlie

 



-- Edited by CharlieC on Monday 13th of February 2017 12:23:18 AM

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MLW


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If I recall correctly, the Schneider-Cruesot 24cm guns were not railway-mounted.

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Legend

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MLW wrote:

If I recall correctly, the Schneider-Cruesot 24cm guns were not railway-mounted.


 Indeed not - the guns were centre pivoted with a fairly substantial gun shield. The whole installation weighed 44 tons.

Charlie

 



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Colonel

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Well, apparently either some of the Schneider-Creuset 240s were delivered prior to the outbreak of WW1, or the ones captured by the Germans were recovered after the Armistice or something of the sort. The "Combat Estimate for Peru submitted to The Intelligence Divisionin Washington by the U.S. Military Attaché at Lima lists the following as the materiel employed by the Peru

"There are two 10" (sic) Schneider Naval guns on Barbett (sic) type Mounts near the Nava lYard, North of the Rimas River, which are not in condition for firing, but which:
could be fixed up with minor repairs." (If so  required I can scan this page of the rather voluminous report)

 

Peruvian sources are clear about the caliber-240 mm but they refer to them as Schneider-Cannet" (sic) as late as 1945.

Gunther



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Legend

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I'd opt for delivery of three barrels and two mounts to Peru before WW1. One of the guns was emplaced at Cumieres (le Mort Homme) - it was blown up in August 1917 when an offensive forced the Germans off the hill. The other was at Fort Vaux - it was probably only fit to be scrapped when the Germans captured Fort Vaux.

Charlie

 



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Colonel

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That would be my answer as well  (two delivered to Peru before WW1)-Din't know about the others seized by the French Army..

Gunther



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