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Post Info TOPIC: What's in an A7V name?


Legend

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What's in an A7V name?
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Just noticed a line in Schneider & Strasheim's Schiffer book, page 8:

"the term 'Sturmpanzerwagen' was applied to it only on September 22, 1918."

Can anyone expand on that? What name was applied before?



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Captain

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They did not know what to call this new piece of technology. In many early WW1 German postcards of captured tanks they were called tankwagen but that was too English I suspect so someone came up with a descriptive term Armoured Assault Vehicle - Sturmpanzerwagen



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Craig Moore


Tank Hunter. Looking for the survivors.

www.tanks-encyclopedia.com

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Major

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I'm sorry I can't remember where I cut this out from many many years ago.

KaOokiv.jpg?1



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Commander in Chief

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*thumbsup

you made my day

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Commander in Chief

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by the way: I just had a look into Steinhardts "Soldbuch" - all the stamps say "Sturmpanzer-Kraftwagen-Abteilung". This was May 1918.

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Legend

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In Eyewitness Swinton describes his (and Dally Jones's) decision to coin the name "tank" (IMO, with more influence from d'Eyncourt than he acknowledges), and says in a footnote that the German equivalent is Schützengrabenvernichtungspanzerkraftwagen. One assumes it's tongue-in-cheek

We know that for a time the Germans also called them "tanks" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CO5SRVy6jcY  http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/8666

So seeing this claim made me wonder when/how the Germans started using different expressions. Was there a directive about it?



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"Sometime things that are not true are included in Wikipedia. While at first glance that may appear like a very great problem for Wikipedia, in reality is it not. In fact, it's a good thing." - Wikipedia.

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