Landships II

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: WW1 Narrow Gauge Locomotive restored


Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 1803
Date:
WW1 Narrow Gauge Locomotive restored
Permalink   


 

Recently completed restoration of a 1917 Hunslett narrow gauge locomotive.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-11/retired-train-drivers-bring-100yo-ww1-locomotive-back-to-life/9137296

Regards,

Charlie

 



__________________
Ned


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 211
Date:
Permalink   

Interesting story, thanks for posting..

Isn't the russian trains on narrow gauge ?



__________________


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 217
Date:
Permalink   

Ned wrote:

Interesting story, thanks for posting..

Isn't the russian trains on narrow gauge ?


Russian railroads are actually wider gauge than most others. 



__________________


Sergeant

Status: Offline
Posts: 46
Date:
Permalink   

The Spanish Army purchased a batch of German narrow gauge (80cm) rolling stock after WWI, some of the locomotives are still preserved for display in army barracks.

The bigger locomotive is an Orenstein & Koppel, there is another one restored with a cargo wagon and passenger car.

The smaller one, as its plaque clearly states is a Henschel, dubbed "Tigris" as, it was said at the time, it was intended to be used in an annex spur of the Berlin-Baghdad railway running from Baghdad to Basrah along the Tigris river.

The locomotives were deployed in Morocco during the Rif war, supporting operations in the Melilla area.

Afterwards they were used for training purposes in the Spanish mainland.

 



Attachments
__________________


Hero

Status: Offline
Posts: 755
Date:
Permalink   

.. just a minor addendum;  Great War German military narrow gauge was 60 cm.



__________________


Sergeant

Status: Offline
Posts: 46
Date:
Permalink   

28juni14 wrote:

.. just a minor addendum;  Great War German military narrow gauge was 60 cm.


 You are right, both locos are 60cm gauge. I had that gauge firmly struck in my mind and didn't bother to measure the track.

 

Also the Orenstein may not be a WWI veteran, as it is recorded to have been built in 1922.

Sorry for misguiding. 

http://www.manuserran.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=220:servicio-militar-de-ferrocarriles&catid=73&Itemid=238



__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us


Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard