Landships II

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Post Info TOPIC: I.D. these guns?


Legend

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I.D. these guns?
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The two in the foreground. Maybe Russian. Any ideas?

6e6fed31-b13e-47ff-ad2d-0147c99458a7.png



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Captain

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The first is a Soviet 152mm field gun, but I cant see very well the difference between the M10/34, the M34 or the M37. Kosar is not veyr clear on these guns.

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Legend

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The other one looks like an Ordnance BL 6inch 30cwt howitzer. This howitzer was obsolete in WW1.

The gun behind the 152mm M37 (ML-20) looks like a Schneider - perhaps it's a Russian 152mm M10/30 howitzer - the WW1 M1910 howitzer

updated in the early 1930s. The recoil/recuperator mechanism has failed and the barrel has moved back inside the carriage.

The gun in the front looks like a 152mm ML-20 - the equilibrator cylinders are immediately in front of, and parallel to, the gun shield. The M34 equilibrators

sloped away from the gun shield and were a fair distance in front of the shield.

Charlie

 



-- Edited by CharlieC on Sunday 29th of April 2018 06:21:30 AM



-- Edited by CharlieC on Sunday 29th of April 2018 06:26:05 AM

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Legend

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A very palpable hit, Citizens. Thank you.

The location is, of course, the Berliner Lustgarten in 1945. The hardware is stuff that was brought from occupied Russia and put on display in Berlin in 1943. That makes me just a little doubtful about the 6inch 30cwt, but I agree there is a resemblance.

As we know, the exhibition included two Mark V tanks that had been in Soviet hands since the War.

The full version of the photo at the top of this thread shows, in the bottom right corner, what is clearly the shed track of one of the Mk Vs, indicating that it has moved or been moved.

Tracks_crop.JPG

 

Here's another shot of the line-up, taken with the photographer's back to the Altes Museum:

Back to Altes Museum.jpg

It's hard to say if these were taken at the same time, or whether the exhibits have been shunted around in the meantime. It looks to me as if the latter might be the case. The Mk V here doesn't seem to have shed a track as the one in the previous photo has.

Something occurs to me. If we examine the various photos of the site (there are about 24 known ones), our collective forensic skills might be able to put them in chronological order and perhaps even work out how the exhibits were originally lined up. We might also enlighten those who like to imagine that the Mk Vs somehow took part in the fighting.

 



-- Edited by James H on Monday 30th of April 2018 01:50:18 PM



-- Edited by James H on Tuesday 1st of May 2018 07:18:32 AM

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"Sometimes things that are not true are included in Wikipedia. While at first glance that may appear like a very great problem for Wikipedia, in reality is it not. In fact, it's a good thing." - Wikipedia.



Legend

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In the second image the gun nearest the camera looks like a Canon de 155 Mle 1917 Schneider although the gun shield looks to have been partially torn off or folded

down. The gun closest to the Mark V might be a Soviet 122mm howitzer but I'm not sure.

Charlie

 



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