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Post Info TOPIC: Leyland Armoured Lorry


Legend

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Leyland Armoured Lorry
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Found this pic of the above. Caption says they are for the East African campaign. They seem to have an armoured cupola, and the searchlight is interesting.

Anyone any info?


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Legend

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Hi James, I'm not sure if this is the same.....

leyland 1915


Cheers

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Commander in Chief

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Sir John Willoughby (the chap leaning on the truck) had four made and gave them to the War Office along with crews (each had a 6-man crew) and support vehicles. They used Leyland's 3-ton Subsidy chassis. Had a MG in the turret and another in the rear. Had a subsidiary rear driving position. Semaphore signalling device can be seen on top of cab. Arrived in East Africa (with two Rolls Royce batteries) March 1916, under command of Willoughby. They were too heavy to do any good in East Africa (poor cross-country ability) and were sent to Egypt. Willoughby resigned. They were then sent to Mesopotamia. The armour was removed and they were converted into anti-aircraft trucks.

-- Edited by philthydirtyanimal at 23:35, 2008-03-12

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Legend

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Doh! It's in B.T. White, where I should have looked in the first place. As it's described as a lorry I only looked in Ellis & Bishop, but it's classed as an armoured car.

Ivor - yes it's the same, and a better picture.

PDA - encyclopaedic as ever. B.T. White's description ends with their disappointing trip to E. Africa, but it struck me that the Middle East would be a handy place to send them from there. The reference Ivor posted says, "Later, these vehicles were equipped to travel on rails." Somewhere in the stuff on Mesopotamia I'm sure there's a pic of an AA railway truck. It might be one of these. I'll try and dig it out.

-- Edited by James H at 01:53, 2008-03-13

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Colonel

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Ivor ,

Thank you for the link : leyland 1915 !!!smile

Intersting the Rolls on Fordson chassis . Super stuff !

Best regards

Gerd

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Legend

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Found the pic of the rail AA gun, but it's an ordinary flat. However, I don't know if this is the the shattered remains of one of the Leylands. What makes me think it might be is that the rear wheels are larger than the front. It has a distinctly improvised look.

Another interesting vehicle produced in Mesop was the motorised rail ambulance.


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Commander in Chief

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I'm fairly sure that that is a pic of a Fiat running on rails. I think it is an Indian Pattern Fiat called HMAC Malaya. There was certainly an Indian Pattern Fiat, adapted to run on rails,in the area! Along with at least two Austin 3rd Series, also adapted for rail work, it formed part of the Railway Armoured Motor Battery. Operated on the line between Basra and Baghdad.

The Leylands had rims fitted to their wheels to try to stop them sinking so much in soft ground, but I dont think theycould also used for running on rails.

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Legend

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You're only bloody right. Even B.T. White doesn't mention that variant, but it is clearly an IndianFiat. How do you do it?

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Commander in Chief

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Bartholomew White; good. David Fletcher; better!

Its not me; I have a pea sized amount of knowledge. But I also have a copy of War Cars by David Fletcher. It is excellent reference for British and Commonwealth (Dominion) armoured cars, anti aircraft lorries and motorbikes.

I wish there was one just like it for everybody else's war cars, and another for softskins.

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Corporal

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I seem to remember a drawing of the Leyland A/C appeared in one of the early issues of Tankette,will trawl through my old issues if anyone is interested.
Ken Musgrave

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