Landships II

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Tel Aviv. Batey ha-Osef Museum


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 231
Date:
Tel Aviv. Batey ha-Osef Museum
Permalink   


I've visited the Museum and I failed to identify a few pieces. Any help would be appreciated:

 

Unidentified british howitzer by Massimo Foti, on Flickr

 

This reminds me of something from WW I, but it looks like an artisan made weapon:

Unidentified gas mortar by Massimo Foti, on Flickr



__________________


Brigadier

Status: Offline
Posts: 275
Date:
Permalink   

The howitzer in your photo is a variation of the British Q.F. 3.7 inch Howitzer.  The breech and carriage are from the 3.7 inch but the barrel is longer. Also, the original 3.7 inch was a screw gun whereas this one does not seem to have the ability to brake the barrel into two pieces.    



__________________
Ralph Lovett


Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 1823
Date:
Permalink   

South Africa produced a few hundred 3.7inch howitzers including 190 which had a monobloc barrel.

(http://nigelef.tripod.com/37inchowsheet.htm)

I guess the 3.7inch was one of the many disparate artillery types acquired by Israel in 1948. 

Regards,

Charlie



__________________


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 231
Date:
Permalink   

Thanks!

__________________


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 231
Date:
Permalink   

What about this?

Unidentified howitzer by Massimo Foti, on Flickr



-- Edited by Massimo Foti on Saturday 26th of January 2019 07:43:56 AM

__________________
MCP


Captain

Status: Offline
Posts: 83
Date:
Permalink   

I think a Schneider 75mm mountain gun M. 1911



__________________


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 231
Date:
Permalink   

MCP wrote:

I think a Schneider 75mm mountain gun M. 1911


 

I've seen a few Schneider 75mm from that period and while there are similarities, they don't match this one. Do you have any picture we can look at?

Here are some I have in my archive. First two mountain gun, then a field gun:

75 mm Schneider-Danglis 06/09 by Massimo Foti, on Flickr

75 mm Schneider-Danglis 1908 by Massimo Foti, on Flickr

75 mm 1912 Schneider by Massimo Foti, on Flickr



__________________


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 231
Date:
Permalink   

Any idea about this?

Unidentified mortar by Massimo Foti, on Flickr



__________________


Major

Status: Offline
Posts: 100
Date:
Permalink   

Keep them coming Massimo, there were just a lot of locally improvised mortars and guns around, so most cannot be properly ID'd, if the museum has not done that

__________________


Major

Status: Offline
Posts: 100
Date:
Permalink   

Your post "what about this", modifed on Sat, shows the 3.7 inch howitzer.

__________________


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 231
Date:
Permalink   

nuyt wrote:

Keep them coming Massimo, there were just a lot of locally improvised mortars and guns around, so most cannot be properly ID'd, if the museum has not done that


 

I don't have any other unidentified piece from around the WW I. But I am still trying to figure out a few mortars and a 20 mm. You can see them here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/massimofoti/albums/72157704469746651



__________________


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 231
Date:
Permalink   

nuyt wrote:

Your post "what about this", modifed on Sat, shows the 3.7 inch howitzer.


 

Thanks for confirming this. I now classified the two as: "QF 3.7-inch" and "Modified QF 3.7-inch"



__________________


Brigadier

Status: Offline
Posts: 275
Date:
Permalink   

It does appear to be a Q.F. 3.7 inch but this example is not a screw gun in Massimo's post.  The standard howitzer of this type has the ability to break the barrel in half for horse or mule transport on pack saddles. In 2006, I rebuilt two of these in Iraq, while not doing counterbattery fire operations on Insurgent mortars.  These two 3.7s are now at the new Iraqi Army's Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.  I posted a few photos of these howitzers so you can see the coupling screw in the center of the barrel.    



-- Edited by Ralph Lovett on Monday 28th of January 2019 01:01:13 AM

Attachments
__________________
Ralph Lovett


Private

Status: Offline
Posts: 1
Date:
Permalink   

1st Time.  Please forgive if I foul up.

I have reason to believe that this a WWII vintage Naval Company Life Saving Gun.  Barrels are manganese bronze and carriages are built up of welded steel parts.

Throwing a  2.50 inch, 17 pound elongated projectile with line, using 2 to 4 ounces black powder, gave a 1050 foot range, with a stout recoil.  The gun could use a .32 cal.

blank, firing lock.  Powder bags were silk, at 2 ounces each.  I own a steel barrel "Lyle" lifesaving gun, and it makes a very good Mortar.  All US ships were required to carry.

Stephen 



__________________


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 231
Date:
Permalink   

Ex-Swiss Krupp 1902 modified in 1922:


7,5 cm Feldkanone 1903/22 Krupp by Massimo Foti, on Flickr

 

7,5 cm Feldkanone 1903/22 Krupp by Massimo Foti, on Flickr



-- Edited by Massimo Foti on Saturday 2nd of February 2019 07:27:00 AM

__________________


Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 1823
Date:
Permalink   

 

The 1922 Swiss modifications were to increase the gun elevation by modifying the trail (attached). The guns retained the wooden wheels - there are images of the 75mm Krupp guns in action with the Israeli Army with the wooden wheels. The Swiss 75mm guns were removed from service in 1945 and were in a disposal yard in 1948 when the Israelis did a deal and acquired something like 100 of them. Most of the Swiss guns were modified by the Israelis by welding stubs onto the original axle and fitting wheels from 25 Pounder guns. I've been told the wheels were sourced from scrap yards in Italy. With pneumatic tires the guns were capable of being towed at much higher speeds than with the old wooden wheels.

Regards,

Charlie

 



-- Edited by CharlieC on Saturday 2nd of February 2019 11:45:25 AM



-- Edited by CharlieC on Saturday 2nd of February 2019 11:46:02 AM

Attachments
__________________


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 231
Date:
Permalink   

There is also a further modified version, called 1902/40 by the Swiss Army, it had metal wheels for mechanical towing:

7,5 cm Feldkanone 1903/40 by Massimo Foti, on Flickr

7,5 cm Feldkanone 1903/40 by Massimo Foti, on Flickr

 

There is also the last incarnation, model 1942, with a muzzle brake. I am not sure if this ever entered service:

7,5 cm Feldkanone 1942 by Massimo Foti, on Flickr



-- Edited by Massimo Foti on Saturday 2nd of February 2019 11:52:04 AM

__________________


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 231
Date:
Permalink   

37 mm modèle 1916 TRP by Massimo Foti, on Flickr



__________________


Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 1823
Date:
Permalink   

 

I agree the barrel and receiver are from a 37mm Mle 1916 TRP gun but the mount isn't anything like the original split trail.

The mount looks like that from a German Maxim MG08 machine gun.

Regards,

Charlie

 



Attachments
__________________


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 231
Date:
Permalink   

CharlieC wrote:

 

The mount looks like that from a German Maxim MG08 machine gun.

 


 

I agree



__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us


Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard