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Post Info TOPIC: Do We Now Know Everything?


Legend

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Do We Now Know Everything?
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Things have been a bit quiet lately. I think the Forum has about 650 members and it gets lots of visitors in addition. Even the more industrious members have been quiet of late.

Does this mean we haveáfinally exploredáand explained every single aspect of "
World War One Military Hardware and the Modelling of this stuff"? I hope not.

I'm very grateful for all the knowledge I have acquired from everyone who has contributed. I hope I've been able to offer something in return every now and then, andáI expect I've got on people's nerves from time to time. Apologies for the things I've got wrong oránot got round to doing. Looking back at some of my early postings, I realise how much more I know now than I did then. Other sites speak highly of Landships, which is a tribute to all contributors and, above all, to Peter K for having the idea in the first place.

I've just realised that this sounds as if I'm dying. Not as far as I'm aware. Perhaps just an early attack of Christmas sentimentality.


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Commander in Chief

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I'm sorry mate, but I can't resist misquoting some bloke from somewhere;

"There are things I know about that I know. Then there are things I know that I don't know. The things that worry me are the things I knowáthat I don't know about. And worst of all is whatáI dont know about things I don't even know exist."

What numpty fed that guy that speech!

You may be right, mate, there is a lot of stuff that has been discussed on this site, and it seems as though most of what is practical to model has been scrutinised and clarified.

I think there may be some mileage in a new section on this forum for enthusiastic WW1 novices to ask simple questions and get simple answers. The search facility doesn't work (at least not by logic). And some of the things that have been discussed are probably very boring for someone who is wondering, say, what HMLS stands for, or if there was a Dragonfly. (questions I asked on here, at some time). It may be daunting to ask one of us 'old hands', something 'silly' like what is the difference between a French Renault and an American 'Renault', for instance.

Anyways; good thread James, and a happy sentimental season to you!

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Corporal

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For me,this forum is the best for the ww1...........simply.

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Corporal

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Piffle.á Always lots more to find out, and more to discover.á WWI machinery is very much a side interest for me, and may be for other forum members.á When I find something interesting, I'll post it and when I'm looking for something I will look here.

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Commander in Chief

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Things have calmed down because the 15% that we know about we have discussed in depth and length.
The 85% we don't know about we obviously have difficulties to discuss because of our ignorance.á

The answer is: More research. Storm your local archive! Search your local newspapers (if they still hold paper editions of the old issues).

The only thing we don't have to worry about is finding survivers, there aren't any left. But some may have written memoirs not yet published...

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MZ


Legend

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A heartening response, citizens.

MZ's mention of survivors saddens me. They are nearly all gone. (Actually, the last German survivor, whose death became something of a cause cÚlŔbre, turned out not to be the last. Several others came forward when his death was publicised)

When they are gone, there will be no one who remembers. And when we are gone, there will be no one who knew someone who remembered. Then it will just be "history", like Blenheim or Agincourt or Hastings. Will the cemeteries be there for ever, or will the time come when it is decided that it was too long ago?

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Legend

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No, we don't know everything. See my "Tank Week in Japan" post under Tanks! Please - someone must know something!!!!!

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Legend

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Quite so, Gwyn. I had forgotten that I still haven't identified the Maharaja of Bikaner, who made a gift of 300,000 rupees in 1918 for the purchase of aircraft and Tanks.

I see you areámaking a little headway with the Japanese angle.

* I tell a lie. Some stuff about him has appeared since I last looked. He was a very large cheese indeed.

Ganga Singh (1880-1943) was a ruler with modern reformist vision of the princely state of Bikaner in present-day Rajasthan, India. He was the only non-Anglo member of the British Imperial War Cabinet during World War I.


This is brilliant: A rare WWI bomber that was discovered in a maharaja's elephant stable in India has been carefully restored on behalf of the UK's Imperial War Museum. The remains of the de Havilland DH9, constructed in 1918, were discovered amid piles of elephant saddles near the Palace of Bikaner in the state of Rajasthan. Much of the aircraft, the first British plane to contain bombs in its fuselage, had been consumed by termites and most of its fabric was missing. The museum acquired the plane in 2000 when the owner, the late maharaja of Bikaner, agreed to handle it to a British collector, who was tipped off about its existence by a backpacker.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/in_pictures/6577629.stmá



-- Edited by James H at 12:03, 2008-12-03

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Legend

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I would say we have an awfull long way to go......

What type of armour plate was used in british rhomboid tanks?

How were the rivet and bolt holes made in the armour plate?

How did this effect maintenance and repairs?

http://www.activeboard.com/forum.spark?forumID=63528&p=3&topicID=12709386

Cheersconfuse


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