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Post Info TOPIC: Model T supply truck


General

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Model T supply truck
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smile I am new to Great War modeling and I am wanting to convert the 1/72 RPM kit of the M.M.G.S. to a supply truck like the 1/35 version. My question is if there is any information on the real vehicle or should I just use the 1/35 kit pictures as a guide? Thank you for your help

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John Kelley
Rob


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Hi John, welcome to the forum. I did quite a bit of research on the Ford model T supply trucks a couple of years back, which basically involved looking at a lot of photographs in the IWM and AWM archives. It appears the same body was fitted to model T's of either the pre-1917 variant with the angular brass radiator or the 1917 onwards version with the more rounded radiator. The body of the RPM supply truck basically seems to be identical to the MMGS version except with a roof. As far as I know the MMGS version is based on a single vehicle which there is a well known photograph of, but I have no mention of it ever leaving the UK.

The body actually fitted to most Model T's i've seen used on both the western front and in hotter climates, such as the light patrol cars, was basically the same - i've seen photographs showing it with no tilt at all such as the Light Patrol Cars, with a tilt just used on the cab (seen on those used in the middle east), or with a cab and body tilt. Personally i'm not a fan of any of the RPM kits as, in my mind at least, they don't really capture the look of the Ford model T.

Hopefully these Australian War Memorial photographs illustrate the body, if you're in the UK I can highly reccomend a visit to the IWM photo archives in London to get photocopies/prints of the images - there was one particularly useful photograph showing a convoy of Model T's from the rear, and on one truck near the camera there was a spare body mounted at an angle giving a view from nearly straight above of it. I've seen the body used with little modification (ie still as a truck/van, but with a properly built cab and rear body) on post-WW1 Model T's too









If anyone were to a decent 1917 Ford model T, i'd gladly buy a few!

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Rob


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A link showing the body quite well

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/ford.jpg

from http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FWWford.htm

A post WW1 Van

http://www.wood-ditton.org.uk/Ford%20Bakers%20Van.jpg

from http://www.wood-ditton.org.uk/saxonhistory1.htm

Come to think of it, i'm pretty certain i've seen at least one photograph of a Model T van such as the one above in use with the Royal Naval Air Service too.

A few more commercial Model T's here

http://www.oldclassiccar.co.uk/fordmodelt.htm

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General

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Thanks that really helps a lot!I live in the USA so I can't get to those great museums.
I was inspired to try Great war modeling by Peter Kempf's Whippet. I have several projects I would like to do in the Model T series. I agree the RPM kit is not that good and it is not easily built but it is the only plastic game in town.

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John Kelley


Commander in Chief

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Here's some photos I've come across.

Attachments
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ChrisG


The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity (Dorothy Parker)
Rob


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Think I took those three of the ambulance - i've got more of it if they're of interest, it was at a 'multi period' living history event I was at with my First World War group, and the ambulance belonged to a member of another group

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Thanks for the pictures. I was unaware the boards for the bed ran length wise. I may take you up on the pictures but for now I am working on a Mack AC

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General

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Thanks for the photos. I may take you up on the pictures as soon as I finish a Mack AC I am working on.

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John Kelley


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You might try" British Military Transport 1829 - 1956" by David Fletcher, it has a couple of pics of the various mods done to both pre and post 1917 Ts, personally I think the book is brilliant and shows not only the Fords but Crossleys, Rolls Royces, Fiats.....etc I think its still in print. Good luck with your project, I am working on the old Airfix 1/32nd scale kits.

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Rob


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Wow, i've never heard of that book - thanks for the heads up Ricks142, will look out for that

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Corporal

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Your welcome, I had a quick look on Amazon, I am in the UK, they have 4 second hand copies with the cheapest being 22.40 plus p & p. Looks like its out of print in the UK.

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Commander in Chief

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Contempory WW1 'Ford Times'

http://www.mtfca.com/books/ford_times.htm

Worth a look.

ChrisG



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ChrisG


The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity (Dorothy Parker)


Colonel

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Have looked carefully at a number of pictures of Fords in the desert but cannot figure out the details of the bed. I get the impression that many of them, including those used by the Light Car Patrol, had custom beds. Some appear to have bins on the side. Any comments?

Al

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