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Post Info TOPIC: Requesting Pictures of MG's in Pack transport - particularly German or Serbian MG's


Lieutenant-Colonel

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Requesting Pictures of MG's in Pack transport - particularly German or Serbian MG's
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I am working on a force of early war Serbians. The 1st line cavalry were well equiped with German Maxim MGs - M1910. These are recorded as being pack transported to keep up with the cavalry. I had found a few (some time ago) photos of such pack transport but unfortunately the gremlins got to them & they either corrupted & / or suffered loss whenI had to "fix" some hard disk issues. Now I'm stuck as I can't find them again.

What Am I looking for? Well most important is the way the MG was placed in thepack saddle. Was it separated into parts or placed on top - complete? Pictures of the supporting pack animals - carring ammunition & / or water would be icing on the cake.

I am aiming to do several vingettes - each a stand of 2 or perhaps 3 pack animals ( mules if I can find suitable figures) carring an MG & supporting supplies with some crew as animal handlers - either mounted & leading or dismounted "working" to load / unload.

In hopeful expectation & with thanks,

Brennan

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Legend

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If you don't get anything better, the US manual on the Maxim M 04, revised to 1916 might give some useful guidance: http://www.allworldwars.com/Handbook%20of%20the%20Maxim%20Automatic%20Machine%20Gun%20Model%201904.html. Pack detail starts at http://www.allworldwars.com/Handbook%20of%20the%20Maxim%20Automatic%20Machine%20Gun%20Model%201904.html#II

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General

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I've got something for you, If you talk to Jack Mueller, he did a sketch for me, of a MG wagon used by the German Cavalry. maybe he could scan it up for you.

Greetings, Josh

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"General, you have nobly protected your forts. Keep your sword...to have crossed swords with you has been an honor, sir." General der Infantrie, Otto von Emmich
              

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