Landships II

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: French Tanks used by the Germans
Tim Rigsby

Date:
French Tanks used by the Germans
Permalink   


Ok, I know this question has been asked before, But I have just read a story in an old German book describing Germans using French Ft-17's and Schneider’s during some offensive????:, Does anyone no if this is the truth, ( If so pictures, please)., or if the Germans used any French equipment besides artillery, to which I no they used allot exp: the famous 75. Even though the Germans saw the French equipment as being Inferior to the English, it seems with the abundance of French tanks etc., being captured, they would find some use for it.


Any information would be greatly appreciated.


All the Best


Tim R.


 



__________________
Peter Kempf

Date:
Permalink   

Tim!


I have never seen any reliable information on the Germans using either the Schneider nor the FT. Their policy seems to have been to use tanks A.) that they considered good enough, and B.) that they had taken in numbers big enough to warrant building up an apparatus for refurbishing and servicing them.


But this does *not* mean that a local unit could not use a captured tank, in good working order, and with sufficient ammo. I have seen photos of FT-17's in working order and in German hands, and that tank was off course good enough for them. But the horrible Schneider? First, to capture one in working order, seems improbable, and then wanting to use it? Naah!


All the best
/Peter K


 



__________________
Tim Rigsby

Date:
Permalink   

Peter


I agree, I would not have used the Schneider, But it would seem the Germans would be desperate enuff to use any vehicles they could get there hands on.  I am not sure of the reliability of this old book, But if the Germans did use the Schneiders, I would love to see how they marked them, and if they used different camo: patterns, and/or made any modification/adjustments to them. Any way it makes for and interesting conversation. Also the picture you saw with the Germans using the FT-17, did you notice any modifications, different markings etc.


All the Best


Tim R.



__________________
eugene

Date:
Permalink   

Gentlemen

The topic of captured tanks under the German flag in WWI is a field that is begging for a book. Not only did the Germans have extensive amounts of Mk.IV's that far out numbered any tanks they produced themselves they also had some whippets and Mk.V

As for French tanks
It is quite certain that big amounts of tanks did fall into their hands, but you must remember that it would take a lot of work to convert a tank, It probably would need to be fixed, the mg needed to be changed and possible the cannons, and money other modifications. Ft-17 probably were used and there is some evidence, as for the Schneider it was horrible and the Germans had no respect for it, it was one of the reasons they delayed their own tank production, they saw tanks as duds. But the amounts of Schneider’s that were recovered by the Germans are large, and due to such big number of machines captured one might suggest they used some, most likely for trials, but maybe even for some local action,

This is one of the big darker areas of WWI tanks, and this can be resolved if some inquiry would be sent to the German archives to search for some clues or documentation of Schneider’s being fixed or modified or used, from records of depots and works at Charloi.

Hope this helps
Captured tanks always facinated me

__________________
Steve Zaloga

Date:
Permalink   

I have a photo of a French Schneider captured by the Germans and used against the 1st Division in the summer of 1918 (and knocked out by a battery of 75mm field guns). There is also a published photo of a Renault FT with a wooden turret tested by BAKP 20 at Charleroi.

__________________
eugene

Date:
Permalink   

could you send the photo of the schneider to this address please: ww1_tanks@yahoo.com

thanks

__________________
Peter Kempf

Date:
Permalink   

To Mr Zaloga: Thanks for the info, I stand corrected. A Schneider used by the Germans in actual combat! I guess it was an initiative by a local commander.


Again: I stand corrected!


/Peter K



__________________
eugene

Date:
Permalink   

A 1/35 scale model of a German Schneidler now that would be quite a rarity, can't wait ot see the photo!


Best wishes to all



__________________
Tim Rigsby

Date:
Permalink   

Mr Zaloga.


     I would also love to see that picture, ww1nut1918@yahoo.com. By the way, I was hoping to meet you at the IPMS show in Atlanta last weekend, That would have been a pleasure, I have followed your awsome work for years, Have you ever did any WW1 Models?, It would be great if you did


All the Best


Tim R.



__________________
Steve Zaloga

Date:
Permalink   

I've sent Peter the photo so he can post it on the site rather than sending out multiple copies. It's nothing all that special in that there are no distinctive German markings and the vehicle is pretty beat up after having been hit by a 75mm.

__________________


General

Status: Offline
Posts: 394
Date:
Permalink   

Bonjour,
 

During the first world war the three types of French "chars d'assaut" was captured by the German Army (Schneider, Saint Chamond and Renault)

 

Schneider :

After the first fight in Juvincourt ( 16 April 1917), more than 30 Schneider stayed in the German lines. 17 was burned, the other was destroyed by shell and five breakdown with motor ot track problems.

The most important part of these tanks were behind second or third German lines. If it was difficult for the German to pick up and repair several Schneider, the Germans had enough tanks to rebuilt some exemplaries for tests and instruction.

In 1917 this fight was the only opportunity to catch a Schneider for the German Army.

 

During the next fights, it was clear that the German soldiers received a good instruction on this tank, and wellknown the observation's slit positions and the parts of the tank without double armor. The black camouflage lines, painted near the slits, was done after the fights of Laffaux et La Malmaison at the end of 1917.

During the fight from January to July 1918, if some Schneider was lost, the German could not take it.

 

In July 1918 Schneider tanks was used near Chaudun (with American Divisions) and the Army signals corps took photo of a destroy Schneider's tank. The back caption of this photo taken by US Army Signal Corps (the number 17668) is : " German tank, large type, put out of action during conter attack by direct hit from 75 mm. gun. 1° Division Artillery. Near Froissy, France, July 20 th, 1918." (German tank is cross out and replaced by French make).

This Schneider is a model 2 and wear markings of the Groupe AS 2 (3 white straights). This Groupe don't fight with the Big Red One but with the 2th Infantry Division.

 

The Big Red One's artillery's reports never speak of a French Schneider used by the German and destroyed by an american 75 mm gun. In front of the Big Red One, just near Missy, an American infantry officer speak of Germans soldiers, hiden in a destroyed Schneider used as bunker.In this sector, it was Schneider's tanks of Groupe AS 1, fighting with the French Infantry Division, north of the American Division.

 

The Schneider's tanks of the Groupe AS 2, fighting with 2th American Infantry Division, was deployed in front of Tigny (7 km South/West of the Big Red One combat zone).

The AS 2 support 6 th US Marine Regiment. On the 8 Schneider used in this attack, 5 were destroyed by German artillery.

Without "As" painted on the tank it's impossible to give the tank's number and the tank's battery of this Schneider. Il's only possible to said that it's the third tank ot 1 th, 2 th or 3 th battery of this Groupe AS 2.

 

Always on photo's caption of this tank.

The village of Froissy is mentionned. Froissy is located 15 km Nord/Est of Beauvais. It was a training zone of the Big Red One before attack on Cantigny on May 28 th, 1918. This village never seen the battle during the First World War . . .

In July, the Big Red One fought on Ploisy sector (4 km South/West of Soissons) . . . . .

An other mistake on this caption : "the 1° Division Artillery" is written in place of "Infantry"

 

Saint Chamond :

Before battle of Méry, in Laffaux et La Malmaison, the destroyed Saint Chamond was in the French lines or so much broken by German or French artilleries in the German lines, that it was impossible to recover these tanks.

During the battle of Méry the Saint Chamond 62668 was captured in Lataule. It was only a tracks problem, and this tank was "pick up" by German's Army. Nine photographies of this tank (and, I hope, may-be more . . . ) were done in Laffaux by German soldiers.

it's also possible that a second Saint Chamond, captured near St Maur, served to repaire Lataule's tank. This second tank was probably an other AS 38 St Chamond. The only report speaking of this second tank is coming from an officer of 7 th Chasseurs. The Artillerie Spéciale reports don't speak ot this second tanks.

 

The report (n° 3559 du 18 Novembre 1918) write by the Major Lemar (1° Brigade d'AS) for Général Estienne speak about :

25 Renault reconnus,

7 Renault non retrouvés,

45 Schneider datant des combats du 16 Avril 1917.

2 Schneider "laissés sur le terrain en 1918"

4 Saint Chamond "laissés sur le terrain en 1918"

 

7 Renault, some Schneider and less than 4 Saint Chamond are probably stayed in the German's Army hands during this war.

Enough for German's J2 officers to study these tanks, and inadequate to be used as Beute panzer against French Army.

For me, during the First World War, not any French's tanks were used during the battle by the German's Army.


And in French, with more details. It was a topic done on french forum 14-18 some months ago.


Sur le site Landships de Tim Rigsby, deux sujets intéressants sur des chars français Schneider et St Chamond.
Il s'agit de photos et de commentaires sur des captures et récupérations de chars.

Suivre sur Landships : On ww1 tanks1AFVs / French AFVs / St Chamond Tank / St Chamond that was taken by the Germans (en rouge)

Premier sujet sur un char Schneider. Sujet tiré du livre de Stephan Zaloga sur les chars allemands 14-18 (Osprey - New Vauguard 127)
Dans son livre "German Panzers 14 - 18 » (page 41) Stephen Zaloga en parlant des combats du 20 Juillet 1918, avec la 1° US Infantery Division mentionne le village de« FROISSY ».

Le village de Froissy est localisé dans l'Oise (60), à environ 15 Km au Nord/Est de Beauvais. Ce village n'a jamais été touché par la guerre. Situé à côté de St Eusoye, il a par contre été le lieu des répétitions de la Big Red One (Bataillons du 28° Rgt Infanterie US) avant les combats de Cantigny avec l'AS 5.

Le village concerné par les combats décrits par Stéphan Zaloga dans son livre est PLOISY dans l'Aisne (02). Ploisy se situe 4 km Sud/Ouest de Soissons (entre Villers-Cotterets et Soissons). Et ce village est tout de même plus cohérent pour la réalité historique quand il s'agit de combats en Juillet 1918.

Dans le même commentaire, Stephen Zaloga parle d'un Schneider utilisé par les allemands, contre les soldats américains, et détruit par un canon de 75 mm américain. Aucun des compte-rendus de l'Artillerie Spéciale ne mentionne cet incident qui suppose qu'un char :
- soit tombé aux en état aux mains des allemands
- est été immobilisé ou partiellement détruit et utilisé comme bunker par un groupe d'allemands.
Dans le premier cas, prendre les commandes et passer à l'assaut avec un char en état est très improbable, au vue de la technicité nécessaire pour manier ces engins.
Dans le deuxième cas, c'est tout à fait envisageable, y compris avec l'armement de bord du char.

Il est bon de rappeller que lors des mises hors de combat des chars, l'équipage, s'il le pouvait, avait pour ordre de démonter les mitrailleuses pour combattre avec l'infanterie, de neutraliser le canon et et de démonter la magnéto du char pour empêcher son redémarrage.
Si l'équipage était totalement tué à ses postes de combat, l'armement du char était, généralement, aussi endommagé que son personnel.

Cette hypothèse de réemploi d'un Schneider par les allemands contre les américains à Ploisy semble très improbable. L'utilisation comme bunker de cette masse de ferraille reste tout à fait plausible, et dans le feu de l'action, sur des tirs provenant d'un char Scheider, il évident que les artilleurs US n'ont pas du chercher à savoir s'il s'agissait d'un char en état retourné contre eux ou de l'action d'un groupe de combattants profitant d'un abri impromptu pour optimiser leur action.
Rendre compte de la destruction d'un char retourné par l'ennemi c'est ausi bon pour les médailles . . .

Pour tous les combats de chars de l'Artillerie Spéciale les équipes des SRR ont toujours, dès la fin des combats, travaillé au dépannage et à la récupération des chars non rentrés. Ce travail était vital car il permettait, en l'absence d'un volant suffisant de pièces de rechange, de maintenir au niveau optimum le parc de chars en service. Les combats de Juillet 18, contrairement à ceux de Juvincourt, Laffaux et La Malmaison, se caractérisent par un mouvement vers l'avant des troupes françaises et américaines, mouvement qui a permis la récupération des chars détruits et l'analyse des conditions de leur destruction. Pour ces combats, le dépôt de la section de récupération était placé à Vierzy (5 km au Sud de Ploisy).

Du 18 au 23 Juillet 1918, 13 « Groupe d'AS » de chars Schneider et St Chamond ont été employés, avec quelques Bataillons de FT 17, soit plus de 100 chars d'Assaut.

La 1° Division US était appuyée par des St Chamond (Groupement XII : AS 37, 38, 39 et Groupement XI : AS 32, 34, 35 ).
Au nord de la 1° Division US était déployé le 1° Rgt de Tirailleurs Marocains appuyé par des Schneider du Groupement III (Groupe d'AS 15).
Au Sud de la 1° Division US étaient déployés le :
- 7° Rgt de Tirailleurs Marocains appuyé par des Schneider du Groupement IV (AS 16 and AS 14),
- 8° Rgt de Zouaves appuyé par des Schneider du Groupement IV (Groupe d'AS 13 et Groupe d'AS 17).

Si de nombreux Schneider furent mis en panne ou détruits, à la limite entre les Divisions françaises et US (Coeuvres, Dommiers, Croix de fer, Ferme Cravançon, Chaudun) rien ne vient confirmer les événements rapportés dans le livre de Stephan Zaloga. Il serait intéressant de pouvoir lire les rapports américains concernant cette action. . . . .

La photo utilisée dans le livre de Stephan Zaloga est bien une photo américaine. Il s'agit d'une photo de l'Army Signal Corps (n° 17668). Elle a bien été prise dans le secteur du plateau de Chaudun et le Schneider détruit est un modèle 2 (qui ne pouvait en aucun cas être présent à Juvincourt en 1917 . . . .).
De fait il s'agit bien d'un Schneider de l'AS 2, mais ce Groupe appuyait, le 21 Juillet 1918, la 2° DI US dans le secteur de Ploisy (et non la 1° DI US dans le secteur de Missy au Bois). Le commentaire au dos de la photo explique l'erreur qui a alors été faite et pourquoi il a été dit que les Allemands avaient retourné un Schneider contre les Américains.
Commentaire au verso de la photo n° 17668 :
" German tank, large type, put out of action during conter attack by direct hit from 75 mm. gun. 1° Division Artillery. Near Froissy, France, July 20 th, 1918."
Sur de commentaire, tapé à la machine, German tank est rayé et l'inscription "French make" est rajouté à la main.
Les recherches faites par l'association Mc Cormick du musée de la Big Red One à Wheaton n'ont pas permis de trouver trace d'un compte-rendu de l'artillerie de la 1° DI US parlant de la destruction d'un Schneider utilisé par les Allemands. Le seul compte-rendu de la 1° DI US qui parle de Schneider détruit est celui d'un chef de section d'infanterie parlant d'un groupe d'Allemands, délogés d'un Schneider détruit qu'ils utilisaient comme Bunker (Il s'agit d'un char de l'AS 1 détruit près de Missy au Bois).

A l'issue des combats du 17 au 23 Juillet 18 au sud de Soissons, les photographes américains ont couvert la zone de combat de leurs 2 Divisions et c'est probablement à cette occasion que la photo prise dans le secteur de la 2° DI US a du être attribuée à une action de la 1° DI US. L'erreur de nom de village (Froissy dans la Somme au lieu de Ploisy dans l'Aisne) montre bien que les photographes ont couvert le secteur de la 2° DI US. Il y a environ 8 kilomètres entre Missy et Ploisy.
Ce schneider reste tout de même non identifié en l'absence d'autres photos . . . .

Le deuxième sujet concerne un char St Chamond capturé.
Le site Landships en donne 4 photos (les photos de Mario Doherr et Tim Rigsby)

Il s'agit du St Chamond modèle 3 n° 62668 du Groupe d'AS n° 38. Ce char était commandé par le Maréchal des Logis Durand. Il a été capturé le 11 Juin 1918 dans le village de Lataule par les allemands. Il s'est mis en panne en franchissant le mur du cimetière de Lataule. l'équipage a alors été fait prisonnier. Les photos montrent bien le choc à l'avant de la caisse. Visiblement le train de roulement du char en a pris un sérieux coup.
Il existe au moins 9 photos de ce char faite par les allemands. Le site Landships en présente une sans visiblement le savoir (il s'agit de la première quand on ouvre sur St chamond).
La 6° montre deux fantassins de l'IR 74 à cheval sur le canon du char.

Cette affaire est décrite dans 4 livres :
Historiques allemands des IR 74 et IR 90 (régiments allemands qui défendaient Lataule)
- Ces deux historiques contiennent des photos du char capturé et malheureusement pas de son équipage.
Les chars de la victoire 1918 par Didier Guénaff et Bruno Jurkiewicz (éditions Ysec)
- Les passages des deux historiques allemands, sur cette capture, sont traduits dans le chapitre sur l'AS 38
Au service de la France par Marie-France Ganansia (Editions Jérome Do Bentzinger)
- Mémoires du général Marcel Rime-Bruneau, qui commandait l'AS 38 à Méry la bataille, ce livre présente
l'affaire du côté français.

Le char du Maréchal des Logis Durand est un excellent sujet pour maquettiste par la richesse de ses marquages. En plus de l'inscription Petit jean et Pas Kamerad, se trouve un Caïman gueule ouverte, qui se retrouve à l'identique sur au moins un autre char du Groupe. Le Capitaine Rime-Bruneau avait baptisé son Groupe "les caïmans".
Le peu de photos connues à ce jour ne permet pas de vérifier si tous les chars du groupe portaient le même insigne.

La traduction, par le site Landships du "Pas Kamarad" en "No Merci" peu aussi se traduire en "pas de quartier" en français !
En effet le Kamarad ! Kamarad ! (avec les bras levés ) restant tout de même dans l'imagerie de guerre l'attitude du soldat qui se rend et ne veut pas se faire tirer comme un lapin. A l'époque, les allemands en capturant l'équipage ont du tout de même un peu s'amuser à la lecture du "pas Kamarad ". . . . (mais probablement pas l'équipage).
Dernier point concernant le St Chamond n° 62668. Au printemps 1919, le commandement de l'AS découvrait seulement que le char avait disparu du champ de bataille.
En effet, dès la fin des combats de Méry, un centre de récupération s'intallait à Tricot (au Nord de Méry) pour s'occuper de la récupération des 73 chars restés sur le terrain. Et la totale disparition du char n'avait jamais été mentionnée.
Si l'équipage avait bien été porté disparu, le commandement pensait le char détruit dans Lataule (voir le livre de Marie-France Ganansia).

Ce sujet de Landships évoque le cas de deux chars français capturés. Il y en eu d'autres et toujours dans le secteur de Lataule.
En juillet 18, le Lt Cheyron du 7° Chasseurs, chargé de récupérer un 77 allemand dans le noman's land, devant le village de Saint Maur, constate au petit matin que dans la même nuit, les allemands ont eux récupéré, non loin de leur 77 un char Saint Chamond abandonné depuis le 11 Juin. Il s'agit ici encore d'un char de l'AS 38.



Bonne fin de week-end - michel



-- Edited by Tanker at 14:14, 2009-02-01

__________________


General

Status: Offline
Posts: 394
Date:
Permalink   

Tanker wrote:

Bonjour,

During the first world war the three types of French "chars d'assaut" was captured by the German Army (Schneider, Saint Chamond and Renault)
Schneider : After the first fight in Juvincourt ( 16 April 1917), more than 30 Schneider stayed in the German lines. 17 was burned, the other was destroyed by shell and five breakdown with motor ot track problems.

The most important part of these tanks were behind second or third German lines. If it was difficult for the German to pick up and repair several Schneider, the Germans had enough tanks to rebuilt some exemplaries for tests and instruction.

In 1917 this fight was the only opportunity to catch a Schneider for the German Army.

During the next fights, it was clear that the German soldiers received a good instruction on this tank, and wellknown the observation's slit positions and the parts of the tank without double armor. The black camouflage lines, painted near the slits, was done after the fights of Laffaux et La Malmaison at the end of 1917.

During the fight from January to July 1918, if some Schneider was lost, the German could not take it.
In July 1918 Schneider tanks was used near Chaudun (with American Divisions) and the Army signals corps took photo of a destroy Schneider's tank. The back caption of this photo taken by US Army Signal Corps (the number 17668) is : " German tank, large type, put out of action during conter attack by direct hit from 75 mm. gun. 1° Division Artillery. Near Froissy, France, July 20 th, 1918." (German tank is cross out and replaced by French make).

This Schneider is a model 2 and wear markings of the Groupe AS 2 (3 white straights). This Groupe don't fight with the Big Red One but with the 2th Infantry Division.

 The Big Red One's artillery's reports never speak of a French Schneider used by the German and destroyed by an american 75 mm gun. In front of the Big Red One, just near Missy, an American infantry officer speak of Germans soldiers, hiden in a destroyed Schneider used as bunker.In this sector, it was Schneider's tanks of Groupe AS 1, fighting with the French Infantry Division, north of the American Division.

The Schneider's tanks of the Groupe AS 2, fighting with 2th American Infantry Division, was deployed in front of Tigny (7 km South/West of the Big Red One combat zone).

The AS 2 support 6 th US Marine Regiment. On the 8 Schneider used in this attack, 5 were destroyed by German artillery.

Without "As" painted on the tank it's impossible to give the tank's number and the tank's battery of this Schneider. Il's only possible to said that it's the third tank ot 1 th, 2 th or 3 th battery of this Groupe AS 2.

Always on photo's caption of this tank.

The village of Froissy is mentionned. Froissy is located 15 km Nord/Est of Beauvais. It was a training zone of the Big Red One before attack on Cantigny on May 28 th, 1918. This village never seen the battle during the First World War . . .

In July, the Big Red One fought on Ploisy sector (4 km South/West of Soissons) . . . . .
An other mistake on this caption : "the 1° Division Artillery" is written in place of "Infantry "

Saint Chamond :
Before battle of Méry, in Laffaux et La Malmaison, the destroyed Saint Chamond was in the French lines or so much broken by German or French artilleries in the German lines, that it was impossible to recover these tanks.

During the battle of Méry the Saint Chamond 62668 was captured in Lataule. It was only a tracks problem, and this tank was "pick up" by German's Army. Nine photographies of this tank (and, I hope, may-be more . . . ) were done in Laffaux by German soldiers.

it's also possible that a second Saint Chamond, captured near St Maur, served to repaire Lataule's tank. This second tank was probably an other AS 38 St Chamond. The only report speaking of this second tank is coming from an officer of 7 th Chasseurs. The Artillerie Spéciale reports don't speak ot this second tanks.

The report (n° 3559 du 18 Novembre 1918) write by the Major Lemar (1° Brigade d'AS) for Général Estienne speak about :

25 Renault reconnus,
7 Renault non retrouvés,

45 Schneider datant des combats du 16 Avril 1917.
2 Schneider "laissés sur le terrain en 1918"
4 Saint Chamond "laissés sur le terrain en 1918"

 7 Renault, some Schneider and less than 4 Saint Chamond are probably stayed in the German's Army hands during this war.
Enough for German's J2 officers to study these tanks, and inadequate to be used as Beute panzer against French Army.

For me, during the First World War, not any French's tanks were used during the battle by the German's Army.

And in French, with more details. It was a topic done on french forum 14-18 some months ago.

Sur le site Landships de Tim Rigsby, deux sujets intéressants sur des chars français Schneider et St Chamond.
Il s'agit de photos et de commentaires sur des captures et récupérations de chars.

Suivre sur Landships : On ww1 tanks1AFVs / French AFVs / St Chamond Tank / St Chamond that was taken by the Germans (en rouge)

Premier sujet sur un char Schneider. Sujet tiré du livre de Stephan Zaloga sur les chars allemands 14-18 (Osprey - New Vauguard 127)
Dans son livre "German Panzers 14 - 18 » (page 41) Stephen Zaloga en parlant des combats du 20 Juillet 1918, avec la 1° US Infantery Division mentionne le village de« FROISSY ».

Le village de Froissy est localisé dans l'Oise (60), à environ 15 Km au Nord/Est de Beauvais. Ce village n'a jamais été touché par la guerre. Situé à côté de St Eusoye, il a par contre été le lieu des répétitions de la Big Red One (Bataillons du 28° Rgt Infanterie US) avant les combats de Cantigny avec l'AS 5.

Le village concerné par les combats décrits par Stéphan Zaloga dans son livre est PLOISY dans l'Aisne (02). Ploisy se situe 4 km Sud/Ouest de Soissons (entre Villers-Cotterets et Soissons). Et ce village est tout de même plus cohérent pour la réalité historique quand il s'agit de combats en Juillet 1918.

Dans le même commentaire, Stephen Zaloga parle d'un Schneider utilisé par les allemands, contre les soldats américains, et détruit par un canon de 75 mm américain. Aucun des compte-rendus de l'Artillerie Spéciale ne mentionne cet incident qui suppose qu'un char :
- soit tombé aux en état aux mains des allemands
- est été immobilisé ou partiellement détruit et utilisé comme bunker par un groupe d'allemands.
Dans le premier cas, prendre les commandes et passer à l'assaut avec un char en état est très improbable, au vue de la technicité nécessaire pour manier ces engins.
Dans le deuxième cas, c'est tout à fait envisageable, y compris avec l'armement de bord du char.

Il est bon de rappeller que lors des mises hors de combat des chars, l'équipage, s'il le pouvait, avait pour ordre de démonter les mitrailleuses pour combattre avec l'infanterie, de neutraliser le canon et et de démonter la magnéto du char pour empêcher son redémarrage.
Si l'équipage était totalement tué à ses postes de combat, l'armement du char était, généralement, aussi endommagé que son personnel.

Cette hypothèse de réemploi d'un Schneider par les allemands contre les américains à Ploisy semble très improbable. L'utilisation comme bunker de cette masse de ferraille reste tout à fait plausible, et dans le feu de l'action, sur des tirs provenant d'un char Scheider, il évident que les artilleurs US n'ont pas du chercher à savoir s'il s'agissait d'un char en état retourné contre eux ou de l'action d'un groupe de combattants profitant d'un abri impromptu pour optimiser leur action.
Rendre compte de la destruction d'un char retourné par l'ennemi c'est ausi bon pour les médailles . . .

Pour tous les combats de chars de l'Artillerie Spéciale les équipes des SRR ont toujours, dès la fin des combats, travaillé au dépannage et à la récupération des chars non rentrés. Ce travail était vital car il permettait, en l'absence d'un volant suffisant de pièces de rechange, de maintenir au niveau optimum le parc de chars en service. Les combats de Juillet 18, contrairement à ceux de Juvincourt, Laffaux et La Malmaison, se caractérisent par un mouvement vers l'avant des troupes françaises et américaines, mouvement qui a permis la récupération des chars détruits et l'analyse des conditions de leur destruction. Pour ces combats, le dépôt de la section de récupération était placé à Vierzy (5 km au Sud de Ploisy).

Du 18 au 23 Juillet 1918, 13 « Groupe d'AS » de chars Schneider et St Chamond ont été employés, avec quelques Bataillons de FT 17, soit plus de 100 chars d'Assaut.

La 1° Division US était appuyée par des St Chamond (Groupement XII : AS 37, 38, 39 et Groupement XI : AS 32, 34, 35 ).
Au nord de la 1° Division US était déployé le 1° Rgt de Tirailleurs Marocains appuyé par des Schneider du Groupement III (Groupe d'AS 15).
Au Sud de la 1° Division US étaient déployés le :
- 7° Rgt de Tirailleurs Marocains appuyé par des Schneider du Groupement IV (AS 16 and AS 14),
- 8° Rgt de Zouaves appuyé par des Schneider du Groupement IV (Groupe d'AS 13 et Groupe d'AS 17).

Si de nombreux Schneider furent mis en panne ou détruits, à la limite entre les Divisions françaises et US (Coeuvres, Dommiers, Croix de fer, Ferme Cravançon, Chaudun) rien ne vient confirmer les événements rapportés dans le livre de Stephan Zaloga. Il serait intéressant de pouvoir lire les rapports américains concernant cette action. . . . .

La photo utilisée dans le livre de Stephan Zaloga est bien une photo américaine. Il s'agit d'une photo de l'Army Signal Corps (n° 17668). Elle a bien été prise dans le secteur du plateau de Chaudun et le Schneider détruit est un modèle 2 (qui ne pouvait en aucun cas être présent à Juvincourt en 1917 . . . .).
De fait il s'agit bien d'un Schneider de l'AS 2, mais ce Groupe appuyait, le 21 Juillet 1918, la 2° DI US dans le secteur de Ploisy (et non la 1° DI US dans le secteur de Missy au Bois). Le commentaire au dos de la photo explique l'erreur qui a alors été faite et pourquoi il a été dit que les Allemands avaient retourné un Schneider contre les Américains.
Commentaire au verso de la photo n° 17668 :
" German tank, large type, put out of action during conter attack by direct hit from 75 mm. gun. 1° Division Artillery. Near Froissy, France, July 20 th, 1918."
Sur de commentaire, tapé à la machine, German tank est rayé et l'inscription "French make" est rajouté à la main.
Les recherches faites par l'association Mc Cormick du musée de la Big Red One à Wheaton n'ont pas permis de trouver trace d'un compte-rendu de l'artillerie de la 1° DI US parlant de la destruction d'un Schneider utilisé par les Allemands. Le seul compte-rendu de la 1° DI US qui parle de Schneider détruit est celui d'un chef de section d'infanterie parlant d'un groupe d'Allemands, délogés d'un Schneider détruit qu'ils utilisaient comme Bunker (Il s'agit d'un char de l'AS 1 détruit près de Missy au Bois).

A l'issue des combats du 17 au 23 Juillet 18 au sud de Soissons, les photographes américains ont couvert la zone de combat de leurs 2 Divisions et c'est probablement à cette occasion que la photo prise dans le secteur de la 2° DI US a du être attribuée à une action de la 1° DI US. L'erreur de nom de village (Froissy dans la Somme au lieu de Ploisy dans l'Aisne) montre bien que les photographes ont couvert le secteur de la 2° DI US. Il y a environ 8 kilomètres entre Missy et Ploisy.
Ce schneider reste tout de même non identifié en l'absence d'autres photos . . . .

Le deuxième sujet concerne un char St Chamond capturé.
Le site Landships en donne 4 photos (les photos de Mario Doherr et Tim Rigsby)

Il s'agit du St Chamond modèle 3 n° 62668 du Groupe d'AS n° 38. Ce char était commandé par le Maréchal des Logis Durand. Il a été capturé le 11 Juin 1918 dans le village de Lataule par les allemands. Il s'est mis en panne en franchissant le mur du cimetière de Lataule. l'équipage a alors été fait prisonnier. Les photos montrent bien le choc à l'avant de la caisse. Visiblement le train de roulement du char en a pris un sérieux coup.
Il existe au moins 9 photos de ce char faite par les allemands. Le site Landships en présente une sans visiblement le savoir (il s'agit de la première quand on ouvre sur St chamond).
La 6° montre deux fantassins de l'IR 74 à cheval sur le canon du char.

Cette affaire est décrite dans 4 livres :
Historiques allemands des IR 74 et IR 90 (régiments allemands qui défendaient Lataule)
- Ces deux historiques contiennent des photos du char capturé et malheureusement pas de son équipage.
Les chars de la victoire 1918 par Didier Guénaff et Bruno Jurkiewicz (éditions Ysec)
- Les passages des deux historiques allemands, sur cette capture, sont traduits dans le chapitre sur l'AS 38
Au service de la France par Marie-France Ganansia (Editions Jérome Do Bentzinger)
- Mémoires du général Marcel Rime-Bruneau, qui commandait l'AS 38 à Méry la bataille, ce livre présente
l'affaire du côté français.

Le char du Maréchal des Logis Durand est un excellent sujet pour maquettiste par la richesse de ses marquages. En plus de l'inscription Petit jean et Pas Kamerad, se trouve un Caïman gueule ouverte, qui se retrouve à l'identique sur au moins un autre char du Groupe. Le Capitaine Rime-Bruneau avait baptisé son Groupe "les caïmans".
Le peu de photos connues à ce jour ne permet pas de vérifier si tous les chars du groupe portaient le même insigne.

La traduction, par le site Landships du "Pas Kamarad" en "No Merci" peu aussi se traduire en "pas de quartier" en français !
En effet le Kamarad ! Kamarad ! (avec les bras levés ) restant tout de même dans l'imagerie de guerre l'attitude du soldat qui se rend et ne veut pas se faire tirer comme un lapin. A l'époque, les allemands en capturant l'équipage ont du tout de même un peu s'amuser à la lecture du "pas Kamarad ". . . . (mais probablement pas l'équipage).
Dernier point concernant le St Chamond n° 62668. Au printemps 1919, le commandement de l'AS découvrait seulement que le char avait disparu du champ de bataille.
En effet, dès la fin des combats de Méry, un centre de récupération s'intallait à Tricot (au Nord de Méry) pour s'occuper de la récupération des 73 chars restés sur le terrain. Et la totale disparition du char n'avait jamais été mentionnée.
Si l'équipage avait bien été porté disparu, le commandement pensait le char détruit dans Lataule (voir le livre de Marie-France Ganansia).

Ce sujet de Landships évoque le cas de deux chars français capturés. Il y en eu d'autres et toujours dans le secteur de Lataule.
En juillet 18, le Lt Cheyron du 7° Chasseurs, chargé de récupérer un 77 allemand dans le noman's land, devant le village de Saint Maur, constate au petit matin que dans la même nuit, les allemands ont eux récupéré, non loin de leur 77 un char Saint Chamond abandonné depuis le 11 Juin. Il s'agit ici encore d'un char de l'AS 38.

Bonne fin de week-end - michel



-- Edited by Tanker at 14:14, 2009-02-01




 



__________________


Corporal

Status: Offline
Posts: 8
Date:
Permalink   

On July 19, 1918 the 76th Company, 1st Battalion, 6th Marines, was attacked on their exposed right flank by two tanks during their advance towards Tigny, France. 2nd Lt Walter S Fant was assigned to take his platoon and knock them out, which he did. He was recognized by the French Army and was recommended for the Medal of Honor by his company commander, 1st Lt Macon C Overton. I have all that back up materials. What I would like to discover is what types of tanks were used by the Germans? The commander of the 75th Company, Fredrick Wheeler remembers the tanks had French markings. Newspaper accounts of this action report Fant was found wounded, inside one of the tanks. Out of ammunition, Fant used his trench knife to kill the crew. A great story, but what kind of tanks were they? Any ideas?



__________________


Brigadier

Status: Offline
Posts: 272
Date:
Permalink   

There are some great, detailed books on German tanks on WW1 (I especially recommend all by Rainer Strasheim), but I'm sure none of them mentions combat with U.S. troops. With British, French and even once Italian - yes, but not with American. That's new to me, and probably to all other forumites. I'd like to know what are your proofs that it really happened.

__________________
Sorry for my bad English ;)


Corporal

Status: Offline
Posts: 8
Date:
Permalink   

I will try again to post two attachments. One is 2nd Lt Fant's Medal of Honor recommendation. The second is the French Army dispatch. I will post a copy of a report Frederic Wheeler, former company commander of the 75th company, made at the request of the American Battle Monuments Commission in 1926. In the report Wheeler mentions the 76th company suffered heavy casualties when a tank attacked their right flank. He remembers the tanks had French markings.MoH recom.JPG



Attachments
__________________


Corporal

Status: Offline
Posts: 8
Date:
Permalink   

I apologize, I do not know why it posted the Medal of Honor recommendation up side down.

__________________


Brigadier

Status: Offline
Posts: 272
Date:
Permalink   

Thank you! Very interesting. It this story is true, the Germans must have used these tanks ad hoc, because in their Abteilungen only A7Vs and captured Mark IV were used and American forces never met them in combat.

__________________
Sorry for my bad English ;)


Corporal

Status: Offline
Posts: 8
Date:
Permalink   

Your English is better than my French. The French 10th Heavy Tank Battalion was attached to the French troops to the south of the Marines on July18. My thought is, the tanks must have been captured the night of the 18th. the French did not advance the morning of the 19th and so the tanks were free to attack the right flank of the 76th. I assume the tanks were St Chamond. What do you think?
Fant was awarded the Croix de Guerre with Palm by the French for what he did.

__________________


General

Status: Offline
Posts: 394
Date:
Permalink   

Bonsoir,

For me it was probably two tanks (and probably Schneider from Groupement n° II or n° IV) destroyed East from Vierzy on July,18 and used as bunker by the Germans.

There is no French Military reports from the four French tanks units, fighting near Vierzy (Grpt n° XI St Chamond - Grpt n° II and IV Schneider and 1° BCL from 501° RAS Renault FT) speaking of French tanks able to fight, and used by Germans . . . .

On July,19, the 2nd US Division fighting, East of Vierzy, in front of Tigny, was fithting with Schneider Tank

Bonne soirée - Michel



__________________


Corporal

Status: Offline
Posts: 8
Date:
Permalink   

Hello,

You would be more of the expert than I on that subject. I have attached the report from then 1st Lt Frederic Wheeler, company commander of the 75th Company that was to the left of the 76th Company. This is his recollection of the events of July 19, 1918. Note this is written in 1926. the advance only lasted about 3 hours. According to Wheeler, the tanks showed up early in the advance close to the line established on July 18. This is why I don't think the tanks were from the advance on the 19th, it was too early. Take a look and see what you think.

The museum that has Captain Fant's military records also has the only operational FT 17 in America. It runs with its original engine, transmission and radiator. Museum of the American GI in College Station, Texas.  



Attachments
__________________


General

Status: Offline
Posts: 394
Date:
Permalink   

Bonjour,

From July 18-23, at Vertefeuille, the 2nd Division was support by, Schneider tanks, from Grpt Schneider n° I (Groupe AS 2, 4, 5 et 9).

Between Vierzy and Tigny,  Renault FT from AS 301, AS 302 Coy (1° BCL from 501° RAS) and Saint Chamond from Grpt XI and XII, was supporting the French 58th ID.

Schneider, Renault FT and Saint Chamond was engaged on the same sector from Vierzy, Taux, Tigny Parcy-Tigny from July, 18 to July, 23.

58° ID was on north sector from 2nd US ID, and on half sector fom 2nd ID from Vierzy to Parcy-Tigny.

Renault FT from AS 301-AS 302 Coy was, first supporting the French 58° ID.

The citation, signed by Petain, was only the copy, from US recommandation written by 76 th Coy, and not a French citation in perfect conformity with events and checked by French tank officers. . . . . .

9 months after these events, it was a detail, and staff officers from Petain's Head-Quarter was probably more in "diplomatic exchange" (medal against medall . . ) than in a perfect historical truth.

Bonne journée - Michel



-- Edited by Tanker on Monday 5th of March 2018 08:20:43 AM

__________________


General

Status: Offline
Posts: 394
Date:
Permalink   

just an error . . . 

 



-- Edited by Tanker on Monday 5th of March 2018 05:57:32 PM

__________________


Corporal

Status: Offline
Posts: 8
Date:
Permalink   

Howdy Michel,

You bring up some good points. All of Fant's citations were reviewed in 1919. There is no mention of his action in his war record nor was the recommendation for the Medal of Honor reviewed. All of that is a US thing. But he was awarded the Croix de Guerre with Palm by the French for his actions near Vierzy. I doesn't make sense to me. Who knows, but something happened out in that field on July 19, 1918. And I would like to find out more if possible.

Regards,

Emmett

__________________


General

Status: Offline
Posts: 394
Date:
Permalink   

About medals, it was probably a fair exchange between French Army and American Army.

Lt Fant received perhaps an American medal for the same citation, or his Coy received order

to write these recommandations to chose American officers for a French medal . . . . . 

The lost of most ot his soldiers are the real event of this fight.



-- Edited by Tanker on Monday 5th of March 2018 06:15:05 PM

__________________


Corporal

Status: Offline
Posts: 8
Date:
Permalink   

Fant received a Citation Silver Star for his actions on July 19. That is far from a Medal of Honor.

One more bit of information. 1st Lt F. W. Clarke Jr, Commanding Officer of the 74th Company wrote in his after action report on July 20, 1918 the tanks that had advanced in front of the 74th on the left flank of the battalion were abandoned after approximately 1000 meters had been covered. He also writes that the 74th Company advanced 1500 meters through artillery and machine gun fire before digging in. That would mean the Marines passed the tanks before stopping. This is why I think the two tanks were recovered by the Germans from the advance on July 18th in the French sector to the south of the Marines sector.

I believe his losing two thirds of his platoon did have an effect on him. In a later engagement he was cited for skillful leadership and exceptional courage and coolness when he led his platoon into St. Etienne without casualties while it was still in German hands. Fant was recommended for a Distinguished Service Cross, which was disapproved and he received another Citation Silver Star. The French Army awarded him a Croix de Guerre with Gilt Star. I would like to know why he is recognized more by the French Army than the US Army for the same action.

__________________


Corporal

Status: Offline
Posts: 8
Date:
Permalink   

Here is some more information I was sent. From the National Archives this letter is from a Battalion level officer. I am gathering information on both Miller and Evans. Fant is mentioned by name going after the tanks. There may be more to come.



Attachments
__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us


Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard