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Post Info TOPIC: "CAMIONS DE LA VICTOIRE 1914-1918"


Hero

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"CAMIONS DE LA VICTOIRE 1914-1918"
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Anyone has this one? Comments?

http://www.barbarossabooks.eu/camions-de-la-victoire-19141918-p-9487.html

D.



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Major

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Hello,

I have this MAGNIFICENT Book with many unpublished Photographs.It is a great Book indeed!
Yours sincerely,
Guy Franois.

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Hero

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Thanks Guy! I fear that my wallet shall fall in the pursuit of this objective.... postage rates from Europe are becoming incredibly high lately!
D.



-- Edited by d_fernetti on Thursday 17th of May 2012 12:34:42 PM

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Lieutenant-Colonel

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This is an outstanding book with many fascinating photographs and a great deal of useful information. I bought a copy a little while ago, and it is one of the best purchases I have made.smile



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Colonel

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Just to say many thanks for flagging this up and for recommending it - especially as the Barbarossa price is said to be half price (presumably of their own post-importation price) - certainly cheaper than the cheapest on abebooks.

I had missed this one and have ordered a copy - look forward to seeing mine when it comes ...

Mike



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Brigadier

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Yes, mine cost me 50 about 5 years ago. Very good book though.

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Lieutenant-Colonel

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May I please readily agree with the previous comments. This is a surperb book, lovingly put together by the authors after what would have been many years tracking down and purchasing original images.

Anyone familiar with the current value of original photographs and the leg work required to find the top images to compile a book such as this will soon tell you that you that this book is an absolute bargin. Go buy while it's so cheap!



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Colonel

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Mine came some days ago. And it's lovely. Not just lorries as the title suggests (at least with my French) but cars, 'breaks', and so on and so forth - mobile pigeon coops, etc. etc.

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Hero

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Yesterday I got this book (on sale!) from Barbarossa Books. It's great! Only thing I would have added would have been more 3 view drawings, but I assume that those are not easily available. Never knew that there was so much variety of vehicles.... The book gives lots of ideas for dioramas and sure one would love to have some of the wackiest designs from the era... Wonder if one can convert any existing kit to one of these trucks...
D.

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Corporal

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Hi Guys

Came across this thread yesterday and did a Google search for a copy. Amazon has it for sale as a Kindle edition at £5.49. My French is minimal but it is full of photographs that I have not seen before.



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Corporal

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Hi Guys

Just discovered the problem with the Kindle edition of 'Les Camions de la Victoire' when used on a Mac computer.

Not having the French language as one of my skills I have been highlighting the text and then using an online translation service from French to English. This worked perfectly until a message came up "You have reached the publisher's copy limit set for this title". I have been onto Amazon (who own Kindle) and nothing they can do. So I am reduced to just looking at the photos. Pity really, it is such a good research document.



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Lieutenant

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Hello! Unfortunately it´s not available at Barbarossa books anymore. Other shops offer it, but it´s very expensive. But at Gallica you can read it (no download as far as I know):

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k33270305.texteImage

How can I create a direct link to the website?



-- Edited by Ruhrpottpreusse on Saturday 2nd of October 2021 04:52:47 AM



-- Edited by Ruhrpottpreusse on Saturday 2nd of October 2021 04:53:24 AM



-- Edited by Ruhrpottpreusse on Saturday 2nd of October 2021 04:55:30 AM

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Field Marshal

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Good but old!
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I've bought the books years ago, definitively a great work even it is missing an index to help to find a specific vehicle. To be honnest, I think it would be necessary to have a new book now, so many pics and docs have been open since it was published.



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Lieutenant

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"CAMIONS DE LA VICTOIRE 1914-1918"
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Hello! Check this out! Two new books about german trucks in WW1 (english language) "Special 1010 and 1011":

https://www.tankograd.com/cms/website.php?id=/en/index/neue_publikation.htm



-- Edited by Ruhrpottpreusse on Thursday 7th of October 2021 04:08:52 AM

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Legend

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I'd be very interested in that. I think I read somewhere that the German army only had about a quarter of the motor vehicles that the Allies had.



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Lieutenant

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RE: number of vehicles
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Hello James! An interesting point. I don´t have any infos about the number of the german motor vehicles. But we can compare the number of the mobilized soldiers. The Entente had (mobilized 1914-1918) 39.000.000 men and the Centre-Forces 21.200.000 men. That´s a little bit less then 2:1. What do you mean with "motor vehicles" in general? Every kind or only lorries?



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Legend

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RE: "CAMIONS DE LA VICTOIRE 1914-1918"
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I don't know - it's just something I kind of remember reading somewhere. You certainly see lots of Allied transport - B Type buses, many types of British trucks carrying supplies and men; photos of the Voie Sacrée show lines of French trucks stretching to the horizon, and the Schneider PB2 single decker bus was used to carry everything from men to cattle. It seems as if the only Germans you see in photos are marching everywhere or on horseback.



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Legend

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I think German Army logistic doctrine was much more focused on rail transport rather than masses of trucks. I read in a recent

article on the US 14inch railway guns deployed to France that they were tasked almost exclusively with disrupting rail traffic

behind the German lines. The 14 inch guns were one of the few guns which could reach the North-South twin track railway the Germans

had built behind the front line and far enough back to be out of reach of most artillery pieces.

Certainly the German Army was short of fuel and rubber in the last months of the war. For example, the Uberlandwagens were used only sparingly because

of their high fuel consumption.

It doesn't answer the question directly but suggests that even if the Germans had masses of trucks they may not have been able to operate them.

Regards,

Charlie

 



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Lieutenant

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Hello Charlie! I agree 100%! That´s my point of view too.



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Field Marshal

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RE: "CAMIONS DE LA VICTOIRE 1914-1918"
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The use of the railway guns to interdict the railways is stated in the report "Handbook of Ordnance Data" referred to in the 30-ton caterpillar gun mount posting.

Please ignore my post regarding finding it on Google ebooks - go to Charlie's link.

Although the report covers all weapons used by the Yanks in WWI, the parts covering the artillery, tanks, and the motorisation of the artillery are fascinating.

The data takes further that contained in the book "Mechanical Traction in War" which costed out mechanised forces vis-a-vis horse-drawn transport.  However, this book only went as far as the Anglo-Boer War, where the transport was steam driven.

The comparisons are astounding regarding the efficiency of tanks vs artillery and horse-drawn transport vis-a-vis petrol-based tracked transport.

This situation, by the way, was complicated beyond belief by the German forces in WWII, where - from a logistic point of view - two armies existed side by side: one fast, mobile one largely equipped with motorised transport (of all sorts and nationalities); and the other slow and plodding, while various parts of the logistic train were commanded by different organisations.  The book "Supplying War" covers from Wallenstein to Patton, with particular reference to the two World Wars.

The report also shows how American industry arose to the challenge of designing and supplying vehicles.  If the war had continued past 1918, the American mechanised forces would have had a massive effect on the War.

Tony

 



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Legend

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The scale of the US mobilisation of its industries to the war effort in WW1 isn't much appreciated these days. The efforts made in WW2

overshadow it and WW1 ended before US industry could get up to maximum effort. A book that's worth at least a skim through to get an idea

of the US mobilisation of industry in WW1 is: 

Benedict Crowell, "America's Munitions 1917-18", Government Printing Office, 1919 (http://archive.org/details/cu31924030744068)

Regards,

Charlie

 



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Field Marshal

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The organisation and outputs are staggering, as is the efficiency of production and utilisation of the labour force in changing from a craft industry to one of mass production.

One sentence alone shows the monumental changes to production - it states that the production of tanks (albeit small tanks) by the Ford Motor Manufacturing Company would have reached one hundred tanks a DAY in 1919!

One of the initial major bottlenecks in production was the conversion of French tank and artillery drawings from metric to imperial; something scratch model makers experience even today as a minor inconvenience thanks to computers.

This is an example of why the US became the military and economic world leader.  Although industry wound down to "normal" levels after the war and even less with the Great Depression, the knowledge and experience were still there for the massive build-up before and during WWII.

A very interesting read!



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