Landships II

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Colors of a Lanz Tactor
MLW


Lieutenant-Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 168
Date:
Colors of a Lanz Tactor
Permalink   


I am wondering what colors were probably used to camouflage the Lanz tractor in this photo.   I read the webpages on German artillery camouflage here but remain confused.  Any help is appreciated!

Regards, Marc



Attachments
__________________

Regards, Marc

Digital History Archive



Commander in Chief

Status: Offline
Posts: 594
Date:
Permalink   

Possibly like their aircraft lozenge camo patterns? The paler of these two, for example.




__________________
MLW


Lieutenant-Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 168
Date:
Permalink   

I wonder.  But the tractor is with the artillery not the air forces.  In fact, its towing wagon from the 42cm M-Gerät 'Big Bertha' howitzer.

Regards, Marc



__________________

Regards, Marc

Digital History Archive



Hero

Status: Offline
Posts: 797
Date:
Permalink   

The scheme is common to late war artillery; particulary foot artillery.  Several surviving examples in original paint schemes survive today in the Brussels Musee.   Attached is the trail of a Flak gun which illustrates the colors used.



Attachments
__________________
MLW


Lieutenant-Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 168
Date:
Permalink   

Thanks! Do you see the colors as brown, sand, and dark green (and the black dividing lines)? Or is there Feldgrau in the pattern too?

Regards, Marc

__________________

Regards, Marc

Digital History Archive



Commander in Chief

Status: Offline
Posts: 609
Date:
Permalink   

The Brussels example is a late war Buntfarben paint job - like most of the museum's German exhibits picked up from the left behinds of the retreating German army in November/December 1918. These were items abandoned by Heeresgruppe Kronprinz Rupprecht - and specifially 4th and 6th Armies marching through Belgium on their way to Germany. They do not feature grey hues; there are different tones of ochre, greens, brown, red-brown, very red brown, and black dividing lines.

The tractor is seen in the first half of 1918, as part of Colonel Bruchmüller's battering train. There ought to be a 'feldgrau' base colour (whatever that means...), to which dapples of various colours have been added - but without black dividing lines. It's a rather common 1917/18 artillery dapple pattern, but the nature of the colours used is open to debate. There was no supply of specific camouflage colours, and the units on the ground used everything they could lay their hands on.



__________________
MZ


Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 245
Date:
Permalink   

mad zeppelin wrote:

The tractor is seen in the first half of 1918, as part of Colonel Bruchmüller's battering train. There ought to be a 'feldgrau' base colour (whatever that means...), to which dapples of various colours have been added - but without black dividing lines. It's a rather common 1917/18 artillery dapple pattern, but the nature of the colours used is open to debate. There was no supply of specific camouflage colours, and the units on the ground used everything they could lay their hands on.


 

Thanks Mad Zeppelin. I agree concerning the towing wagon (tube on the transport wagon). Here annother picture.

 

 

Just an additional thougth: Lanz tractors originally had a light bluish-gray color tint. Could be that they didn't overpaint the blue with 'feldgrau' and just added some dapples as described above ...

 

 

BTW the tractor on the right in Marcs picture is again the rare Kaelble; only two had been built. One of them found its way to Aberdeen after the war together with the Big Bertha! Any further information on "Colonel Bruchmüller's battering train"?

 

Cheers, Peter



__________________

"Siplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-



Commander in Chief

Status: Offline
Posts: 609
Date:
Permalink   

'A light bluish-gray color tint' would count as 'feldgrau', like any reasonably dulled colour; so, most probably dapples just added.

The 'battering train' was the heavy and long range artillery that was shifted around in support of the various German offensives in 1918.



-- Edited by mad zeppelin on Tuesday 23rd of October 2012 01:57:26 PM

__________________
MZ
MLW


Lieutenant-Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 168
Date:
Permalink   

Thanks for the information! One last question for now - did the front wheels on the tractor have solid rubber "tires"?

Regards, Marc

__________________

Regards, Marc

Digital History Archive



Hero

Status: Offline
Posts: 797
Date:
Permalink   

No,.. cast steel.



__________________
MLW


Lieutenant-Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 168
Date:
Permalink   

Thank you very much!



__________________

Regards, Marc

Digital History Archive



Colonel

Status: Offline
Posts: 245
Date:
Permalink   

28juni14 wrote:

No,.. cast steel.


 I' am quite not an expert for Lanz tractors, but it seems more likely pressed steel to me.

Look here ...

 

Cheers, Peter





__________________

"Siplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-

Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us


Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard