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Post Info TOPIC: 75mm Krupp Export guns


Legend

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75mm Krupp Export guns
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As noted in another thread there isn't any single source of information on these guns.

Rather than try to accumulate all the information on these guns and probably get it wrong in various ways I thought we could try a colaborative

project. If you know anything about the 75mm Krupp guns please contribute - anything will help - images, refs, etc.

Once we have a reasonable amount of info I'll wrangle it into an article for Landships II.

Regards,

Chalrie



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Legend

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Just to kick things off - here's what I know about the Turkish 75mm guns.

The Ottoman army acquired 75mm guns in 4 orders before WW1 plus a batch of ex-Brazilian guns in 1914 and captured Rumanian guns in 1917.

The orders were:

1904 - 96 Model 1903

1905 - 462 Model 1903

1910 - 90 Model 1909

1911 - 88 ???? (haven't seen a survivor of this order - anyone help?)

The Model 1903 guns were a mixture of foot and field artillery with a screw actuated sliding breech. There is a prominent fore sight on the left side of the

reciever.

The Model 1909 guns had the same sliding breech block as the FK 96 n.A - the survivors in Australia all have axle tree seats.

The pre-war guns were processed through the Imperial Arsenal at Istanbul and were remarked in Osmanli script. The gun numbers are in sequence

through the orders. Judging from the dates inscribed on the guns the 1904 order guns were processed in 1905, the 1905 order was processed in

1906-07. The dates on the 1910 order guns all seem to have been processed in 1910.

The batch of guns in 1914 (40 or 54?) came from a Brazilian order seized by the German Army at Krupps. The Brazilian guns were designed to fire

a heavier shell than the standard 75mm but could fire the standard 75mm round.

An unknown number of Rumanian guns was seized/captured by Turkish divisions fighting with the Central Powers. Rumania collapsed in March 1917 and one of the divisions

(26th) was posted to Palestine. The Rumanian guns were similar to the Model 1903 except that they used a Rumanian designed panoramic sight.

There is also an additional handwheel and small gearbox on the right side of the receiver - this moves the sight bracket via a series of rods according

to a restorer of one of these guns.

The Brazilian and Rumanian guns retained their original markings.

Lots of images, etc at: http://www.ammsbrisbane.com/home.html?L0=2&L1=4&L2=0

Regards,

Charlie



-- Edited by CharlieC on Tuesday 23rd of October 2012 08:39:15 AM

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Hero

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This is a worthy subject,  .. I will participate.   I have a file somewhere with a few sketches that are mroe than 10 years old;  I'll try to dig them up.



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Here's a 1909 Krupp gun in Argentina. I have seen several others in parks or guarding the entrance to military buildings. This one, believe it or not, is in the entrance courtyard of a confectionery factory! As you can see, all the engraved legends are translated to Spanish.



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Legend

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Thanks for the contribution

Notice the interrupted screw breech - not what one would expect on a Krupp gun.

I've read that Argentina held field gun evaluation trials before they ordered the Krupp gun. I suspect the Argentine Army requested that Krupp should

modify the standard 75mm. There is a Krupp patent for an interrupted screw breech dating from about 1905 which looks like this breech. The 75mm Krupp

Gebrigskanone M1908 (the one for the Japanese) seems to have used the same breech design.

It would be nice to know how many guns Argentina purchased and how long they were in service. I have a recollection that some of the 75mm Krupp guns

were reworked as a close support gun in the 40s(?)

Regards,

Charlie 



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My dad did his military conscription as advanced observer and radioman for the Artillery in 1955, and they still used them. He didn't recalled them with much love, as they used to have a rather haphazard range...


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Legend

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The number of rounds that had gone through those barrels by then might have had something to do with that. They must have received new tubes if they were re-worked for the range-critical task of close support - but after some hundreds of rounds ...

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In summer 1909 Argentina ordered 76 six-guns batteries

Calibre: 75mm L/30

Lenght of the barrel: 2250 mm

Number of the barrel grooves: 24

Weight of the barrel: 330 kg

Weight in action: 950 kg

Weight of the limber: 650 kg

Weight in marching order: 1600 kg

Weight of the ammo wagon: 1554 kg

Shield thickness : 4 mm

Weight of the shell: 6 kg - charge 9 kg

Weight of the shrapnel: 6 kg - 295 bullets x 9 g

Muzzle velocity: 510 m/s

Max. range: 6000 m

Recoil: 1.22 m

Elevation: + 16° / - 10°

Traverse:

Track: 1.48 m

Transport: drawn by 6 horses

Ammunition: limber - 34 rounds (according some sources 32); wagon body - 56.

Remarks:  recoil system with hydraulic buffer and springs, swinging block breech mechanism, traverse on pivot.
It was equipped with telescopic sight, and fitted for an independent line of sight. It was equipped with mechanical fuze-setter.

Adopted after a competition beetwin Krupp, Ehrhardt, SDchneider, Armstrong and Vickers-Maxim guns.



-- Edited by MCP on Wednesday 24th of October 2012 10:47:16 AM

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Legend

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Thanks - that's great info.

I've been doing a bit of digging - I had a vague memory the Krupp guns were recycled as a close support gun.

Memory didn't fail me: Canon de Infanteria C.75mm "Matorras" - 1945 - designed by Lt. Col. Matorras - built from shortened Krupp barrels with a

locally developed carriage which seems to be influenced by the WW2 German IG 18. The Krupp breech block was replaced with a Maxim-Nodernfeldt type which

according to one website had a quicker action than the Krupp breech. The gun served in the Argentine Army into the 50s.

 

Barrel length (without muzzle brake) - 1000mm (L/13)

Weight in battery - 465 kg

Projectile weight - 6.3 kg

Propellant weight - (min) 60gm, (max) 130gm

Muzzle Velocity - 210 m/sec

Max. Range - 3750 m (min), 5200m (max)

 

Websites:

http://www.aacvm.com.ar/cpg132/displayimage.php?album=35&pos=8

http://www.taringa.net/posts/hazlo-tu-mismo/11225922/Armas-Argentinas_-Canon-de-infanteria-Matorras-_75mm_.html



-- Edited by CharlieC on Wednesday 24th of October 2012 09:52:04 AM

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In summer 1909 Holland ordered 30 semi-automatic Krupp guns for the colonies

Calibre: 75mm L/30

Lenght of the barrel: 2250 mm

Number of the barrel grooves: 28

Weight of the barrel: 346 kg

Weight of the carriage: 632 kg

Weight in action: 987 kg

Weight of the limber: 602.5 kg / 589 kg

Weight in marching order : 1567 kg / 1580.5 kg

Weight of the wagon-body: 986 kg / 994 kg

Weight of the ammunition wagon : 1573 kg / 1586. 5 kg

Shield thickness : 4.5 mm

Height of the line of fire : 960 mm

Weight of the shell: 6 kg - charge: 190 g but see below

Weight of the shrapnel: 6 kg -  270 bullets x 11 g but see below

Muzzle velocity:

Max. range:

Recoil: 1.35 m

Elevation: + 16° 8' / - 10°

Traverse: 3° 30'

Track: 1.48 m

Transport: drawn by 6 horses

Ammunition: limber - 27 rounds; wagon body - 60.

Remarks:  It was equipped with dial sight, and fitted for an independent line of sight.

"The Krupp gear in question is applied to an ordinary 75mm gun with a wedge breech-block actuated by a vertical spindle. On the lower end of this is an arm projecting laterally, terminating in a knob which strikes a projection from the cradle when the gun runs up or back. On recoil the projection yield and lets thje knob pass freely; during the last six inches of thye run-up the projection arrests the knob, forcing the spindle to revolve and the breech to open, in which position it is hel by a catch connected with the extractor till the next rouns is inserted, when the breech is closed by a spring. It is is clear that the action of this device depends upon the gun running up correctly, and according Messr. Krupp use somewhat elaborate check-buffer to ensure a smooth and complete run-up" (The Royal Artillery Journal, 1914, pp. 1-2).

I have no data about the shell and shrapnel, but they are probably the same employed by standard Holland field guns.



-- Edited by MCP on Wednesday 24th of October 2012 10:47:34 AM

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Legend

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That's interesting - I wonder if Krupp patented the semi-automatic breech in the US - if so then Google patent search should be able to find it.

Kosar's "Artillerie im 20 Jahrhundert" says Holland recieved 204 Model 1903 75mm Krupp guns.

The guns appear to be the standard M03:

Calibre - 75mm (L/30)

Elevation - -7 to +16.5 deg

Traverse - 8 deg

Weight in battery - 990 kg

Max range - 6.4 km

Muzzle velocity - 500 m/sec

Shell weight - 6.0 kg

The Dutch did modify the 75mm between the wars but I have no idea what they did to them.

Regards,

Charlie

 



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Legend

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Great start on the 75mm Krupp gun.

We've only got Sweden, Switzerland, Rumania, Belgium, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Brazil and the secondary users like Israel and Peru to go.

Regards,

Charlie



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In summer 1903 Holland ordered 28  six-guns field batteries and 2 six-guns horse of Krupp M. 03

Calibre: 75mm L/30

Lenght of the barrel: 2250 mm

Barrel grooves: 28 - depth - 0.75 mm, wdth - 5.92 mm

Weight of the barrel: 350 kg

Weight of the breech-block: 28 kg

Weight of the carriage: 640 kg

Weight in action: 990 kg

Weight of the limber: 777 kg (428 kg empty)

Weight in marching order : 1767 kg

Weight of the wagon-body: 1070 kg (546 kg empty)

Weight of the ammunition wagon : 1847 kg (974 kg empty)

Shield thickness : 4 mm

Height of the line of fire : 990 mm

Weight of the cartridge: 1.2 kg - charge: 440 g (7.725 kg shelled)

Weight of the shell: 6 kg - charge: 190 g - Percussion fuze: 130 g

Weight of the shrapnel: 6 kg -  270 lead bullets x 11 g - charge: 75 g - T & P fuze: 290 g

Muzzle velocity: 500 m/s

Max. range: 5600 m (with time fuze)

Recoil: 1.28 m

Elevation: + 16° / - 8°

Traverse: 3° 30'

Track: 1.48 m

Transport: drawn by 6 horses

Ammunition: limber - 36 shrapnel and 4 H.E. shells; wagon body - 48 shrapnel and 16 H.E. shell

Remarks: recoil system with hydraulic buffer and springs, wedge breech mechanism, traverse on pivot.
It was equipped with telescopic sight, but not fitted for an independent line of sight. It was equipped with mechanical fuze-setter.

 



-- Edited by MCP on Wednesday 24th of October 2012 11:12:43 AM

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As for Romania, excuse me if I'm quoting myself.

Field gun : www.bulgarianartillery.it/Bulgarian%20Artillery%201/Krupp%2075mm%201904_Romania.htm

Horse gun : www.bulgarianartillery.it/Bulgarian%20Artillery%201/Krupp%2075mm%201908_Romania.htm



-- Edited by MCP on Wednesday 24th of October 2012 10:46:28 AM



-- Edited by MCP on Wednesday 24th of October 2012 10:47:59 AM

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In 1900 Sweden ordered some horse batteries of Krupp M. 00

Calibre: 75mm L/30

Lenght of the barrel: 2250 mm

Weight of the barrel: 350 kg

Weight of the carriage: 537 kg

Weight in action: 887 kg

Weight of the limber: 713 kg

Weight in marching order : 1600 kg

Weight of the ammunition wagon : 1600 kg

Shield thickness : no shield

Height of the line of fire : 970 mm

Weight of the cartridge: 1.2 kg - charge: 600 g (8.3 kg shelled)

Weight of the shrapnel: 6 kg -  295 lead bullets x 11 g

Muzzle velocity: 500 m/s

Max. range:

Elevation: + 18° / - 8°

Traverse:

Transport: drawn by 6 horses

Ammunition: limber - 40 rounds; wagon body - 92 rounds

Remarks: field gun à tir accéléré equipped with spring-spade to reduce the recoil. The gun had no shield and the limber was armoured.



-- Edited by MCP on Wednesday 24th of October 2012 11:12:03 AM

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 Sweden ordered some field batteries of Krupp M. 02

Calibre: 75mm L/30

Lenght of the barrel: 2250 mm

Weight of the barrel: 340 kg

Weight of the carriage: 635 kg

Weight in action: 975 kg

Weight of the limber: 825 kg

Weight in marching order : 1800 kg

Weight of the ammunition wagon : 1800 kg

Shield thickness : 4.75 mm

Height of the line of fire : 970 mm

Weight of the cartridge: 1.2 kg - charge: 600 g (8.3 kg shelled)

Weight of the shrapnel: 6 kg -  295 lead bullets x 11 g

Muzzle velocity: 500 m/s

Max. range: 

Elevation: + 16° / - 6°

Traverse:

Transport: drawn by 6 horses

Ammunition: limber - 44 rounds; wagon body - 96 rounds

Remarks: recoil system with hydraulic buffer and springs, wedge breech mechanism, traverse on pivot.
It was equipped with telescopic sight, and fitted for an independent line of sight.



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MCP


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AFIK Bulgaria was a secondary user of 75mm Krupp field guns.

In 1912-13 the Bulgarian Army captured 144 field Krupp guns during the Balkan War.

After the war they were introduced into the Army. It seems that in 1914 106 - 75mm Krupp ex-Turkish field guns of various patterns were available, but before the entry of Bulgaria in WW1 (October 1915) some other guns had been repaired and sent to the troops.

In 1915 Bulgaria bought 18 - 75mm "Brazilian" guns.

Deatails at: www.bulgarianartillery.it

 



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As for Brazil see:

75mm M. 1905: www.bulgarianartillery.it/Bulgarian%20Artillery%201/Krupp%2075mm%201905_Brazil.htm

75mm M. 1913: www.bulgarianartillery.it/Bulgarian%20Artillery%201/Krupp%2075mm%201913_Brazil.htm



-- Edited by MCP on Wednesday 24th of October 2012 11:24:47 AM

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Legend

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Jump back to Holland - the Krupp gun was known as 7-veld in Dutch service. In 1926 the existing stock of 75mm guns were modified by HiH to increase

the max. elevation. This combined with a new shell of better ballistic characteristics took the max. range to 10,000m.

The Dutch Army had 304 guns in service which suggests the Dutch acquired some 75mm guns after the 1904 order.

Regards,

Charlie



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The pictures of the "Matorras" Krupp were taken on the Museo de Armas de la Nación, a place worth a long visit if anyone visits Buenos Aires. There are lots of WW1 related weapons, and of course, of other periods as well. It's one of the greatest small museums that remains vrtually unknown except for the enthusiasts.



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Sweden ordered M1902 guns from Krupp (104 guns) and built the gun under licence at the factories of Finspång (106 guns), Bofors (68 guns) and Stockholms Vapenfabrik (36 guns).

Some 120 of these guns were converted to M02-10 and the Bofors M02/33. (more on these later).

Regards,

Charlie





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Another secondary user - Finland.

Finland acquired the first 12 guns already just before Winter War in October of 1939. Finland purchased another 12 guns during the war from Sweden. Also Swedish volunteer unit SFK (whose weaponry was financed with donations gathered in Sweden for Finland) arrived with 12 guns. When Sweden loaned further 24 guns to Finland during Winter War the total number of these guns used in Winter War reached 60. 24 guns were returned to Sweden and the remaining guns were used early in the Continuation War - survivors were used as coastal defence guns in 2-gun batteries until the end of WW2.

(http://www.jaegerplatoon.net/ARTILLERY3.htm)

The images of a surviving M02 at the Tykistömuseo

Regards,

Charlie




-- Edited by CharlieC on Wednesday 24th of October 2012 12:17:54 PM

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In 1903 Switzerland ordered 288 Krupp M. 03

Calibre: 75mm L/30

Lenght of the barrel: 2250 mm

Barrel grooves: 28 - depth - 0.75 mm, wdth - 5.92 mm

Weight of the barrel: 330 kg

Weight of the carriage: 663 kg

Weight in action: 993 kg

Weight of the limber: 757 kg

Weight in marching order: 1750 kg

Weight of the ammunition wagon : 1750 kg

Shield thickness: 4.25 mm

Shield weight: 76 kg

Shield height: 1550 mm

Height of the line of fire: 990 mm

Weight of the cartridge: 1.2 kg - charge: 515 g 

Weight of the shell: 6.35 kg - charge: 215 g

Weight of the shrapnel: 6.35 kg -  210 bullets x 12.5 g

Muzzle velocity: 485 m/s

Max. range: 5900 m (with time fuze) - 6500 m (with percussion fuze)

Recoil: 1.35 m

Elevation: + 16° / - 8°

Traverse:

Track: 1.4 m

Transport: drawn by 6 horses

Ammunition: limber - 40 rounds; ammunition wagon - 96 rounds

Remarks: recoil system with hydraulic buffer and springs, wedge breech mechanism, traverse on pivot.
It was equipped with dial sight, but not fitted for an independent line of sight.



-- Edited by MCP on Wednesday 24th of October 2012 12:20:03 PM

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In 1902 Denmark bought 128 Krupp M. 02

Calibre: 75mm L/30

Lenght of the barrel: 2250 mm

Number of barrel grooves: 28

Weight of the barrel: 327 kg

Weight of the carriage: 708 kg

Weight in action: 1035 kg

Weigfht of the limber: 900 kg

Weight in marching order: 1935 kg

Weight of the ammunition body: 1150 kg

Weight of the ammunition wagon : 2050 kg

Weight of the observation ladder: 22 kg

Height of the observation ladder: 3 m

Shield thickness: 6 mm

Weight of the cartridge: 1.45 kg - charge: 600 g (shelled 8.7 kg)

Weight of the shrapnel: 6.75 kg295 bullets x 11 g

Muzzle velocity: 500 m/s

Max. range: 6000 m

Recoil: 1.37 m

Elevation: + 15° / - 9°

Traverse: 3° 3'

Track: 1.5 m

Transport: drawn by 6 horses

Ammunition: gun limber - 44 rounds; ammunition limber - 48 - ammunition body - 72 rounds

Remarks: recoil system with hydraulic buffer and springs, wedge breech mechanism, traverse on pivot.
It was equipped with dial sight, but not fitted for an independent line of sight. A pyramidal observation ladder could be on the ammunition wagon.



-- Edited by MCP on Wednesday 24th of October 2012 12:58:34 PM

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Legend

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This is interesting - a couple of images from the Vickers image archive. The gun is a 75mm Krupp M05+ - slide breech, etc.

I haven't seen the traversing platform before - anyone know if it was ever used. A similar design was standard on the British WW2 25 Pounder.

Regards,

Charlie

 



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In 1907 Italy ordered 39 four-guns field batteries and 9 four-guns horse batteries Krupp M. 06; Krupp had to deliver also the materials to prepare 68 more batteries in Italy.

Calibre: 75mm L/30

Lenght of the barrel: 2250 mm

Barrel grooves: 28 - depth - 0.75 mm, wdth - 5.92 mm

Weight of the barrel: 345 kg

Weight of the carriage: 665 kg

Weight in action: 1010 kg

Weight of the limber: 690 kg

Weight in marching order: 1700 kg

Weight of the ammunition wagon : 1750 kg

Shield thickness: 4 mm

Height of the line of fire: 950 mm

Weight of the shell: 6.5 kg - charge: 140 g

Weight of the shrapnel: 6.5 kg -  360 bullets x 9 g

Muzzle velocity: 510 m/s

Max. range: 6000 m (with time fuze) - 6800 m (with percussion fuze)

Recoil: 1.44 m

Elevation: + 16° / - 10°

Traverse: 3° 30'

Track: 1.45 m

Transport: drawn by 6 horses

Ammunition: limber - 30 rounds; ammunition wagon - 90 rounds

Remarks: recoil system with hydraulic buffer and springs, eccentric screw mechanism, traverse on pivot.
It was equipped with panoramic sight, and fitted for an independent line of sight.



-- Edited by MCP on Wednesday 24th of October 2012 01:55:08 PM



-- Edited by MCP on Wednesday 24th of October 2012 02:21:52 PM

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In 1911 Italy ordered 9 four-guns hose batteries of a lighter pattern, the 75mm Krupp M. 12.

Calibre: 75mm L/30

Lenght of the barrel: 2250 mm

Barrel grooves: 28 - depth - 0.75 mm, wdth - 5.92 mm

Weight of the barrel: 338 kg

Weight in action: 943 kg

Weight in marching order: 1496 kg

Shield thickness: 4 mm

Height of the line of fire: 950 mm

Weight of the shell: 6.5 kg - charge: 140 g

Weight of the shrapnel: 6.5 kg -  360 bullets x 9 g

Muzzle velocity: 510 m/s

Max. range: 6000 m (with time fuze) - 6800 m (with percussion fuze)

Recoil: 1.44 m

Elevation: + 18° 30' / - 12°

Traverse: 3° 30'

Track: 1.45 m

Transport: drawn by 6 horses

Ammunition: limber - 30 rounds; ammunition wagon - 90 rounds

Remarks: recoil system with hydraulic buffer and springs, eccentric screw mechanism, traverse on pivot.
It was equipped with panoramic sight, and fitted for an independent line of sight



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I think that an article collegcting all the infos available about 75mm export guns would be very usefull. If anybody wants to try to make it, he can use all the material I posted without any problem. I have data also for Chile and Japan and, maybe, for other lesser countries (China?, I should check). I'll add them as soon as possible.

BTW. I could try to do the same thing about 75mm Krupp mountain guns.

 

Best,

 

Marco



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Thanks so much for sharing your info. I am sure this will be much appreciated by many, and can lead to the definite work about the topic.

If it is of any help, I might try to arrange a trip to the Krupp archives. Naturally the investigation order should be narrowed down as much as possible first. From earlier threads here however I gather that WW2 left not much material there at all about the 75mm guns.



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China was also a 75mm Krupp user - found this by Google search.

"China seems to have acquired several batteries of these guns prior to the 1911 Revolution. Chinese guns seem to have been designated the M-1903/06 field gun. It has been reported in Early 1900s Chinese Ammunition Manufacture that direct copies of these field guns were produced at both the Hanyang Arsenal and Jiang Nan Manufacturing Bureau in Shanghai as the L/29 field gun.

*75mm: Italian Cannone da 75/27 modello 1906. China is reported to have acquired an unknown quantity of these field guns after the First World War to supplement their standard Krupp M-1903/06 field guns. The Cannone da 75/27 was an Italian licensed copy of the original Krupp commercial design built by Ansaldo and Armstrong Pozzuoli. The origin of the Chinese guns is unclear, but some of them may have been acquired as surplus from Poland as well as from Italy directly.

75mm: Japanese Type 38 and Type 38 Improved (Model of 1905) field guns. This was a Japanese licensed production version of the Krupp commercial field gun listed above, and was the most important Japanese field gun until the appearance of the Schneider designed Type 90 (Model of 1930) field gun during the early 1930s. Many of these weapons were captured during the Sino-Japanese War and employed against their former owners or were subsequently acquired from abandoned stocks after 1945 and used during the Civil War."

http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?f=101&t=162448 

Regards,

Charlie



-- Edited by CharlieC on Thursday 25th of October 2012 12:16:13 AM

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The Krupp archive material was either destroyed in WW2 or seized by the Allies after WW2 with the intent of prosecuting Krupp management.
There was a release of Krupp archive papers in a British archive a few years ago - these were from the prosecution of Krupp after WW2
but run from the 1920s onwards so they aren't much use for us.
There isn't much useful material left - they do have a copy of the delivery book which runs up until 1912 which details all the gun deliveries
Krupp made.
Regards,
Charlie


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In 1902 Denmark ordered 128 M1902 75mm Krupp guns. These remained in service until WW2, in 1937 8 of 11 field artillery battalions were equipped with the Krupp gun (96 guns).

The only modification which seems to have been made to these guns was adding a rubber tire to the wooden wheels to make the gun more suitable for vehicle towing.

Regards,

Charlie



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Bofors M 02/10

The Swedish Army recognised the main problem of their M1902 guns was the short range caused by the limited elevation (16 deg) of the gun.

Financial restrictions meant that the Krupp guns were reworked rather than replaced by more modern guns.

The first modification was to put the barrel and reciever into the carriage of a 10.5cm Bofors M10 howitzer. This was similar to the WW1 German

7.7cm KiH. About 12 guns were converted - they were fairly heavy (1225kg) and had very limited traverse (2 deg) but the max. barrel elevation was increased

to 40 deg and the max. range increased to 10,000m compared to 6500m for the standard gun. 

The first attached image is a 10.5cm Bofors M10, note the traverse platform in the second image

Regards,

Charlie



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In 1909 China ordered 60 Krupp field guns

Calibre: 75mm L/29

Lenght of the barrel: 2175 mm

Weight of the barrel: 320 kg

Weight in action: 900 kg

Weigfht of the limber: 600 kg

Weight in marching order: 1500 kg

Weight of the ammunition wagon : 1500 kg

Shield thickness: 3 mm

Height of the line of fire: 950 mm

Weight of the shell: 6 kg 

Weight of the shrapnel: 6 kg -  330 bullets x 9 g

Muzzle velocity:

Max. range: 

Recoil: 1.37 m

Elevation: + 16° / - 10°

Traverse: 3° 30'

Track: 1.5 m

Transport: drawn by 6 horses

Ammunition: limber - 32 rounds; ammunition body - 56 rounds

Remarks: recoil system with hydraulic buffer and springs, sliding wedge breech mechanism, traverse on pivot.
It was equipped with collimator, clinometer, and was fitted for an independent line of sight.



-- Edited by MCP on Thursday 25th of October 2012 11:19:05 AM



-- Edited by MCP on Thursday 25th of October 2012 04:17:02 PM

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Serbia had minimum 150 ex Turks Krupp field guns. In First WW in august and september 1914th Serbian Combined division had 6 bateries with Krupp field guns. Serbia delivered 6 bateries Krupp field guns to Montenegro. Around a dozen Krupp field guns was modernized in AA guns in the spring and summer of the 1915th. Minimum one German aircraft was shot down above Kragujevac in september 1915th with this guns. The problem was a small reserve of ammunition.

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Continuing the Swedish improvements to the 75mm Krupp gun - 108 Krupp M02s were converted in 1933 to the Bofors M 02/33.

"The 7,5cm Kanon m/02-33 was a decent improvement of the old 7,5cm Kanon m/02. On a completely new lavette (some sources seem to indicate that this was the same lavette as the 7,5cm Kanon m/40) the elevation was improved to 43° and the traverse to 50°. The increased elevation allowed for the range to increase to 10 000 meters. Some of the guns (no source I have indicate how many) had rubber rim steel wheels instead of the old spoked wood wheels, to make them suitable for high-speed motor towing. The new lavette made the gun heavy though, almost too heavy for the standard horse set used by the Swedish artillery to move their guns."

http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=164193

Barrel - L/27

Projectile weight - 6.6 kg

Muzzle Velocity: 496 m/s

Max elevation: 43°
Range: 10 000 m
Traverse: 50°
Gun weight in action: 1 400 kg

A very similar carriage was used on the later 75mm Bofors M 40 gun.

 



-- Edited by CharlieC on Thursday 25th of October 2012 02:04:34 PM



-- Edited by CharlieC on Thursday 25th of October 2012 02:05:10 PM



-- Edited by CharlieC on Thursday 25th of October 2012 02:05:49 PM

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Israel used the 75mm Krupp gun - we're getting far away from WW1 but the gun was still going.....

The state of Israel was created by the UN in 1948 - the new state immediately was at war with the surrounding Arab states. A priority was to acquire any weaponry which

would allow the Israeli Army to hold off the Arab armies. Israel acquired 50 75mm Krupp guns with 80,000 rounds. It isn't entirely clear where the guns came from

but there is a reasonable case that Switzerland sold some of their remaining 75mm Krupp guns.  The trails of the guns appear to have been modified compared to the

original gun - the rear of the trail was widened without the sheet metal on the the top and bottom of the trail. This modification may have allowed a small increase in

maximum elevation.

The Israeli guns were modified for vehicle towing by replacing the wooden wheels with rubber tired wheels from 25 Pounder guns. The smaller diameter wheels required 

mounting arms to be welded onto the original axles to maintain the same contact point. the Krupp guns served throughout the 1948 War of Independence and eventually

were used for training in the 1950s. A number of the Krupp guns have been preserved as monuments throughout Israel.

The Israelis acquired de-milled M4 Sherman tanks from dumps in Italy. In 1949, 6 of these tanks were armed with 75mm Krupp guns. However, there were difficulties

in adapting the gun sights and the conversion wasn't very successful. 

The image of the breech markings is from a fairly battered survivor at the Yad Mordecai Museum - thanks to Ilan, the curator, for the images.

Regards,

Charlie



-- Edited by CharlieC on Friday 26th of October 2012 08:40:04 AM

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Some corrections/additions to the post about Turkish guns:

The 1911 order was for 12 horse and 10 field batteries (88 guns). These data are sure, since the come from the Krupp Archives, quoted by Fahri Türk (a) and are confirmed by (c).

As for the Brazlian guns, they were 40, according with Zdenek Jindra, who found the information in Krupp Archive too. 

According with a Turkish General Staff work, Turkey received 54 - 75mm Krupp guns in 1914, and I think that the number is correct, since that book is usually accurate (the data I could check are always correct). Probably Germany added another 14 guns, probably Brazilian, since I don't know of any other 75mm gun at hand in the Krupp factory in 1914.

To the list 3 more guns should be added:

1898: 1 - 75mm L/30 field gun

I'll post the data soon.

1912: 1 - 75mm L/30 a/a gun

http://www.bulgarianartillery.it/Bulgarian%20Artillery%201/Krupp%2075mm%20L30%201912%20Bak.htm

1912: 1 - 75mm L/28 a/a gun

http://www.bulgarianartillery.it/Bulgarian%20Artillery%201/Krupp%2075mm%20L28%201912%20Bak.htm


 

(a) TÜRK. Fahri : Die deutsche Rüstungsindustrie in ihren Türkeigeschäften zwischen 1871 und 1914. Die Firma Krupp, die Waffenfabrik Mauser und die Deutschen Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken. Ein Beitrag zu deutsch-türkischen Beziehungen. Frankfurt am Main : Peter Lang 2007, p. 166.

(b) JINDRA. Zdenek : Die Rolle des Krupp-Konzerns bei der wirtschaftlichen Vorbereitung des Erstern Weltrkriege. Jahrbuch für Wirtschafts-geschichte 1976/1, pp. 155.

(c) GENELKURMAY HARP TARH BAKANLII : rk Silâlhi Kuvvetleri Tarihi III Cilt, 6 Kisim (1908-1920) Ankara : Basimevi 1971




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In 1898 Turkey received a 75mm L/30 field gun as a gift from Kaiser Wilhelm II

Calibre: 75mm L/30

Lenght of the barrel: 2250 mm

Weight of the barrel: 350 kg

Weight of the carriage: 557 kg

Weight in action: 918 kg

Weigfht of the limber: 830 kg

Weight in marching order: 1748 kg

Weight of the ammunition wagon : 1688 kg

Shield thickness: no shield

Height of the line of fire: 920 mm

Weight of the cartridge: 1.12 kg - charge: 670 g

Weight of the shell: 6.5 kg 

Weight of the shrapnel: 6.5 kg - 277 bullets x 11 g - T&P fuze: 320 g

Muzzle velocity: 500 m/s

Max. range: 

Elevation: + 18° / - 10°

Traverse:

Transport: drawn by 6 horses

Ammunition: limber - 38 rounds; wagon body - 44 rounds

Remarks: gun à tir accéléré equipped with elastic spur brake, wedge breech mechanism, traverse on pivot.



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Japan sold 12 Type 38 field guns to Peru in 1933. Attached is a survivor at the Fortaleza real Felipe, Callao - the gun is clearly a Type 38 Kai with

box trail.

Japan also sold 24 Type 38 guns to Ecuador in 1940 - I don't know if there are any survivors or images of the guns.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/594514/thread/1290203493/Osaka-Krupp+gun+in+Callao

Regards,

Charlie

( Type 38 notes coming up )



-- Edited by CharlieC on Friday 26th of October 2012 07:18:50 AM

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