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Post Info TOPIC: Saint-Chamond 120mm SPG


Legend

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Saint-Chamond 120mm SPG
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The attached image is in the latest Blindés et Matériel - the image caption says that nothing is known about it.

The gun is a 120mm Saint-Chamond field gun not accepted by the French Army. The front two bogies of the 

Saint-Chamond chassis are blocked up presumably to make the suspension rigid so the tank can withstand the

weight and recoil of the 120mm gun.

Anyone know anything about this SPG?

Regards,

Charlie



-- Edited by CharlieC on Sunday 4th of May 2014 07:45:29 AM

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Legend

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I have seen the photo, with description, elsewhere, but can't remember where. Maybe Jeudy? Seems odd that the people at GBM haven't got chapter and verse. I'll have a look for it at this end.



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Major

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Looks a bit nose heavy!
Mike

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Legend

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mike_m wrote:

Looks a bit nose heavy!
Mike


 I'd guess the St-Chamond 120mm gun weighed about 2 tons compared to about 1 ton for the 75mm St-Chamond or 75mm Mle 1897. There isn't enough room in the forward part of the St-Chamond tank to mount the gun further to the rear without running into the engine.

Regards,

Charlie



-- Edited by CharlieC on Sunday 4th of May 2014 01:02:58 PM

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Hero

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The only bit of information I can find states this was a one-off experimental piece ?
Paul

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General

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Would make an interesting kit conversion - lots of those oddities coming out of the woodwork these days; some kits produced almost from a bit of a sketch on the back of a fag packet.
For those who aren't into engineering, a cardboard 30-fag packet was used on site to give foremen instructions on urgent modifications, including sketches, that then stayed on site as part of the documentation. Was a bit of a bugger when I gave up smoking!!


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