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Post Info TOPIC: Copying a small model to go larger


Lieutenant-Colonel

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Copying a small model to go larger
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I want to build a larger model in 1/8 or 1/4, and take the measurements from a 1/35 scale plastic kit to work from. Whats the best way to do this, is it just using a set of verniers or is there other more accurate methods to do this. Can anyone advise.  



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Legend

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Any chance of using a dimensioned drawing to give you at least the major measurements?

Going upwards in scale always incurs the problem of increasing the errors so it doesn't take too many erroneous

measures and your large scale model winds up a mess.

Have you thought about using photogrammetry to start with a 3D model of your 1:35 model and scale it with software.

The exact relationships between the parts should be maintained.

Regards,

Charlie

 



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Lieutenant-Colonel

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I was thinking about scaling it with software using pictures etc and proof sizing with the original to see how far i would be out with measurements. Never heard about photogrammetry with a 3D model, how does that work. 



-- Edited by BC312 on Tuesday 12th of May 2020 08:17:29 PM

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Legend

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Lots of overlapping images and software can produce a 3D image of just about any static object you can get enough images of (*).

It's also possible to go from the mesh software to Blender to make a 3D object and then by partitioning the model to

sub-assemblies.

There's a ocean of knowledge on the Internet about photogrammetry - here's a tiny part:

https://blog.prusaprinters.org/photogrammetry-3d-scanning-just-phone-camera/

https://medium.com/realities-io/getting-started-with-photogrammetry-d0a6ee40cb72

Regards,

Charlie

* - there are limits - large areas of smooth flat surfaces , shiny reflective objects and transparent objects don't work very well

 

 



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Lieutenant-Colonel

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Thanks Charlie. Is this the way big modeling companies get the details of full size tanks, aircraft to make their kits. I always wondered how they get such detail spot on. It must take ages to measure up the real thing and scale down. I think there was a video i saw of how a model kit was formed, most probably not with photogrammetry but the old way.

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Legend

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I think the model companies use a mixture of photogrammetry and old fashioned work with a tape measure. 

There are still plenty of models which get onto the market which have noticeable inaccuracies so it's probably

a trade off between budget available and accuracy.

Charlie

 



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Commander in Chief

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Lasers can be used to produce very accurate 3d drawings of objects.

A few years ago I saw the Vickers Independent tank being laser scanned.

Attached is a video of Mephisto scans.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=taFlaodsm-U

 



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ChrisG


The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity (Dorothy Parker)


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I wonder how much it cost to get a tank or anything laser scanned.


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