Landships II

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Paint primer on ww 1 tanks etc


Corporal

Status: Offline
Posts: 5
Date:
Paint primer on ww 1 tanks etc
Permalink   


Hi ,


Were british ,french and german tanks coated with a primer before getting painted or were they in raw steel ? I`ve seen the pics of the Whippet tank in original paint scheme and it seems to me that it was painted inside and outside with a very thin layer of paint direct on the steel without any primer. If primer were used was it in the familiar antrazit red or did other colors occure. The reason for passing these questions is that I`m planning to schratcbuild some WW1 tanks in 1/15 scale and I`m for the moment gathering information and I guess this site is the right place to do so !!!


Cheers


Rino Kristiansen


 


 


 



__________________


Commander in Chief

Status: Offline
Posts: 609
Date:
Permalink   

From the scarce photographic evidence it would seem that the German A7Vs (at least some of them) received some primer. Apparently, different colours were used to produce some gaudy schemes, that later do not appear on tanks in the field. Available primer colours in Germany were dark grey (anthrazite), light redbrown and light green. Examples are 501 and possibly 562 (which may also carry a regular colour camouflage scheme). Note that this is all guess work trying to interpret monochrome pictures.


On captured tanks (Mk.IVs) the chocolate brown British paint was usually overpainted and served as primer. British Mark IVs seem to have had a dark grey finish when leaving factory. The chocolate brown was applied later on. I've just found a report (in fact a kind of war correspondent article) dealing with Kaiser Wilhelm's visit to Le Cateau in December 1917 where he was shown the captured Mk.IV F.13. The tank is described as "dark grey". So possibly some tanks at Cambrai were sent forward before they could receive the chocolate brown cover.



__________________
MZ


Corporal

Status: Offline
Posts: 5
Date:
Permalink   

Hi MZ,


 


Thanks a lot for your answer on my request. Your information has given me some "knobs" to heng some paint on ...when I get to that point !!!


 


Cheers


Rino



__________________


Lieutenant

Status: Offline
Posts: 68
Date:
Permalink   

Hello Mephisto!
Well aware that all available steel primers before 1960 were of poisonous or toxic character, the Surgeon General gave orders not to use them in wartime to avoid
additional infection of wound inflicted by "sparked-off" splinters in tanks or at the
back side of artillery shields.
Red-Brown Stuff was of PbMnO4 and derivates
light Grey Stuff was of KArNO3 type or derivates
Light Green Stuff was of ArCl2NO3 type or similar.This being so the decision
from the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut may be well understood. Pertinent information may be found in the ABC-Exhibition of the "Wehrtechnische Studiensammlung der Bundeswehr"
now based in Koblenz:
http://www.bwb.org/01DB022000000001/vwContentByKey/W26EJB3D868INFODE
On this grounds no further details are seriously available from the German parts in WW I and WWII.

Best regards,

Pody

__________________
"Ein Volk, das keine Waffen traegt, wird Ketten tragen!" (Carl von Clausewitz)


Corporal

Status: Offline
Posts: 5
Date:
Permalink   

Hi Pody,


Thanks a lot for that interesting info !!!


 


Cheers


Mephisto


 



__________________


General

Status: Offline
Posts: 376
Date:
Permalink   

Pody,
does that mean that the A7Vs did not have any internal painting?
Tony

__________________


Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 3592
Date:
Permalink   

This is excellent stuff. It had never occured to me before. Lead and arsenic in the paint - as if they didn't have enough to put up with.

An additional thought: I think I remember reading that when Mephisto was renovated after years out in the open, the colour scheme was arrived at by examining remnants of paint that had survived in nooks and crannies in the hull. Maybe the Queensland Museum or the AWM have some info.

__________________

"Sometimes things that are not true are included in Wikipedia. While at first glance that may appear like a very great problem for Wikipedia, in reality is it not. In fact, it's a good thing." - Wikipedia.



Brigadier

Status: Offline
Posts: 286
Date:
Permalink   

I believe WW1 Era German Artillery might serve as a good indicator of how the German Army of the Era primed and painted their armored vehicles and other equipment.

In the restoration of at least eight German WW1 Era Foot, Field and Naval Guns I have constantly found  Red-Oxide Primer (dark reddish/reddish-Brown) in the unexposed parts like the interior of the recoil cradle and the underside of the barrel facing the recoil cradle.  Additionally, I found this same color primer on WW2 German Anti-Tank Guns.  

By the way, I have found WW2 Japanese primer to be Orange and US WW1 Primer to be Lime Green.

R/

Ralph Lovett
http://www.lovettartillery.com/index.html



__________________
Ralph Lovett


Hero

Status: Offline
Posts: 824
Date:
Permalink   

Good God Halfords had it right all along !!!!

__________________
Barry John
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us


Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard