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Post Info TOPIC: Turkish Artillery
Anonymous

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Turkish Artillery
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Dear Friends, Contributors and Webmasters; I thank you all for you did a wonderful job to present the equipment of the great war to the public. However, I'm a little disappointed for not seeing a section on the Ottoman artillery. I hope you shall add a section about the third (altough somewhat weak) great power of the central powers too.

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Field Marshal

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Dear Anonymous!


You are of course right: this is missing. Partly, I think, because this is a difficult subject that requires special knowledge.


Anyone out there willing to chip in? What about you?



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/Peter Kempf


Hero

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The Ottoman army fielded the 9cm c73 variant in substantial numbers.  It's replacement, the Krupp 75mm commercial version of the c96 n/A equipped their first line divisions.  Korps artillerie was represented by the 15cm c93 sFH, some  21cm Msr, and some L 15cm RKanone. They had a host of small mountain howitzers and guns.  Some 10.5cm lFH had begun to arrive also when the war began.  Their fortress artillerie was basic Krupp from the 80s.  Additionally, the Asia Korps sprinkled their modest, but excellent artillerie around too.  There were examples of new pieces from the Skoda 15cm M14, to th 13cm K.  The Germans even sent a batterie of 7,7cm  L FK L/35 (Franz.) to serve in the desert.


An interesting story reputes the Turks managed to high-jack a shipment of brand new Schneider 75mm guns in route to Serbia in 1912.   There is some obvious truth to the story as a 1918 post-hostilities photo shows a number of these guns in a British captured weapons pool somewhere outside Jerusalem.



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Field Marshal

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Thanks Jack! I've put your posting in the article on the Ottoman Army (uniforms), at least for now. Hope that's ok!

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/Peter Kempf
Anonymous

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dear mr kempf and 28juni, I thank you both. I've never seen such a concise summary of turkish artillery ordenance before juni put this little paragraph. perhaps you may label a section on artillery page as "ottoman artillery" and then paste juni's ordnance list as links to the previously reviewed german and austro-hungarian field pieces. maybe only the old 9cm gun and 75 mm krupp shall be reviewed as separate entries.


I have also a question that I'm much too curious to learn. I have all the life-like/emhar 1/24 cannon models. I know the specific names and models of all except that "75mm world war I artillery piece" this frustrating model has no clue about its country of origin, producer and production year. perhaps great war modeling experts shall help me.


I apologise for not giving my name (and for not enrolling to the forum as member). it's just because of my laziness :) I will enroll ASAP.


cheers


emir "von" yener, the self-made aristocrat ;), from Istanbul



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Hero

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I believe I am familiar with the Life'Like model artillery kit you reference.  It is the USA 3inch Model 1902/05.  Around the turn of the century US Ordnance experts were trying to design a modern QF field piece. (I frequently use the Brit terms; QF= quick fire, and QL= quick load in artillerie discussions.)


The new German firm of Ehrhardt (later to become the monstrous Rheinmetall; the largest single manufacturing/holding entity in all of Europe today) was contacted and their firm provided much of the design for the new field gun; to include the "long recoil" patent, which the Americans honored via payment. ( For more on this recoil system, please see my brief on the French behavior with this patent in another tread.) The end result was the Germophile Model 1902 3inch field gun.  Though it was never seen in WW1 Europe, it did see action with Pershing's 1916 Mexico Expedition.


Incidently, Ehrhardt is the same firm the British approached when they looked for a new field piece during the same time period.



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Anonymous

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juni thank you so much. you have cleared a great mystery for me. do you think this basically pretty model can be used as a base for a possible conversion to a turkish M03 75 mm QF gun ?


cheers


emir



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Anonymous

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Dear Turkish artillery specialists.


I am researching a Dutch company called HIH Siderius (alos known as HIH and Haiha) and this company (a Rheinmetall offshoot) delivered some guns to Turkey in the late 1920s. Apparently this involved a rebarreled 18pdr (?). Survivors of these HIH deliveries are said to remain still on exhibition in Istanbul's Askeri Muzesi and one day I hope to visit this Museum.


Is anyone of you familiar with the Turkish HIH story or does anyone know the surviving guns in Istanbul (or possibly in other museums)?


I would be very obliged if anyone would confirm the HIH guns still on show!


For those would want to read more:


http://www.overvalwagen.com/HIHSiderius.html


and for the Turkish HIH mystery (in Dutch):


http://www.network54.com/Forum/330333/thread/1129736828/HIH%27s+Turkish+connection


Kind regards,


A.F. Nuyt


 


 


 



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Major

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Does anyone have any ideas on what color the Turkish field guns were?
Did the German supplied guns come camoed, did the Turks repaint them?
I can not seem to find anything on this.

Thanks,
Chris

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General

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There are a number of Ottoman/Turkish WW1 Era Artillery photos within this Artillery Forum link:
 http://www.network54.com/Forum/330333/message/1124627539/Turkish+artillery
 This shows some WW1 and Post War Turkish pieces in Disruptive Camouflage virtually identical to the typical WW1 German patterns.   
 The 7,5cm GK L/13, 9cm C/1873, 10,5cm lFH 16, 15cm sFH 13, 15cm lg sFH 13 in my collection were types in German as well as Ottoman/Turkish service. 
 This link is:    www.lovettartillery.com


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Ralph Lovett
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