Landships II

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Presentation Tank at Canterbury.


Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 3462
Date:
Presentation Tank at Canterbury.
Permalink   


Reproduced here for discussion purposes only, obviously. New to me.

 



Attachments
__________________

"Sometimes things that are not true are included in Wikipedia. While at first glance that may appear like a very great problem for Wikipedia, in reality is it not. In fact, it's a good thing." - Wikipedia.



General

Status: Offline
Posts: 360
Date:
Permalink   

Could be a MarkIII...

__________________


Sergeant

Status: Offline
Posts: 42
Date:
Permalink   

Despite having MkIV style sponsons it isn't a MkIV. Hull rear is wrong and it has the V type exhaust deflectors. Could be a Mk II or a Mk III, although as built they would have had Mk I style sponsons. Could be a Composite: can't see the other side. After the war a lot of tanks given out as presentation pieces or on touring displays were modified or re-worked with whatever parts were available. Particularly those that had been converted to supply tanks. With only 250 (IIRC) Mks I, II and III built and most of the survivors in France in 1917 converted to Supply, the likelihood of finding original sponsons post-war was low.

Accuracy wasn't a high priority anyway. So this one could have had a MkIV female sponson set added on the visible side to make a Composite with a Mk I/II/III Male sponson on the other. Or could be an ex Supply tank refitted with MkIV Female sponsons on both sides.

I offer the Bovington MkII as evidence of the sort of thing that went on. Built as a MkII Male 1916. Converted to Supply 1917. Post war, re-armed but as a Composite: sponson type unknown. Went on tour. Returned to Bovington and was mocked up as a Mk1 Female, complete with steering gear. Eventually returned to MkII spec when the last MkI was donated. But not entirely as parts were no longer available, and so remains a MkI/II hybrid. The female sponson fitted is the last known surviving MkI female sponson anywhere.



__________________
Peter Smith


Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 3462
Date:
Permalink   

Exhaust deflectors + trapezoid hatch on top = ?



__________________

"Sometimes things that are not true are included in Wikipedia. While at first glance that may appear like a very great problem for Wikipedia, in reality is it not. In fact, it's a good thing." - Wikipedia.



General

Status: Offline
Posts: 360
Date:
Permalink   

It could be some kind of hybrid of course!
But following the D Fletcher "landships", the MkIII was the first to be fitted with the new MG sponsons.
As the MkIII never leave England, it could make sens they was later used for exhibition.

__________________


Sergeant

Status: Offline
Posts: 42
Date:
Permalink   

Ah. I was labouring under the misapprehension that MkIII still had MkI type sponsons as I understood they and the MkIIs were essentially built as training tanks for the MkI but with the opportunity to try out some modifications.

__________________
Peter Smith


Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 1390
Date:
Permalink   

It's a well-known photo of Canterbury's Mark III Female. It doesn't have Mark IV type sponsons, but the later type of Mark III Female sponsons. Hadn't commented before as I didn't see anything to comment on.

Gwyn

__________________

Britain to Stay in EU. We are the 48%.



Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 3462
Date:
Permalink   

Sorry for the inconvenience.

I didn't know there was a later type of Mark III Female sponson. This sounds interesting. Do you want to say more? No obligation.



__________________

"Sometimes things that are not true are included in Wikipedia. While at first glance that may appear like a very great problem for Wikipedia, in reality is it not. In fact, it's a good thing." - Wikipedia.



Legend

Status: Offline
Posts: 1390
Date:
Permalink   

No inconvenience. Sorry to be a bit tetchy before - I wasn't feeling well.

At first the Mark III Females were built with the larger sponsons familiar from the Mark I and II. Fletcher says just one or two tanks had these larger sponsons, and I have no reason to doubt that. But then a new smaller sponson was introduced that was similar in shape and size but not in detail to that of the Mark IV. One key point is that unlike the Mark IV sponson, it could not be swung inboard. Therefore it doesn't have the Mark IV's hinges, or centre cover strip but it does have two hooks to allow it to be lifted by a crane, as it would have to be when the tank was moved by rail.

The other point is that there is only one row of rivets at the top of the sponson. Mark IVs have a double row.

Gwyn



__________________

Britain to Stay in EU. We are the 48%.

Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us


Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard