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Post Info TOPIC: What Is Moss Green?


Colonel

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What Is Moss Green?
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It's a light green (I assume) color used on British tanks, as it was mentioned as a color in my Takom Whippet kit.  It actually looks akin to the lighter green used on post-WW2 American vehicles, or am I mistaken?



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Captain

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Green Moss is the name of a colour in the MiG WW1 British paint set. AFAIK there was no official colour called this. British greens of the WW1 era were generally of Khaki shades. Perhaps not unlike the WW2 Khaki Green 3. The only name attributed to that colour that I have found is "Service Colour". Others may have better information.

The real truth about WW1 colours is that no-one really knows. Colours were not codified and few original un-weathered samples of vehicle colours have survived. They were batch-mixed from linseed oil and dry pigments with white lead powder and had to be used immediately. So there was a great deal of variation. And they were satin when new, not matt.

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Peter Smith


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Peter Smith wrote:

Green Moss is the name of a colour in the MiG WW1 British paint set. AFAIK there was no official colour called this. British greens of the WW1 era were generally of Khaki shades. Perhaps not unlike the WW2 Khaki Green 3. The only name attributed to that colour that I have found is "Service Colour". Others may have better information.

The real truth about WW1 colours is that no-one really knows. Colours were not codified and few original un-weathered samples of vehicle colours have survived. They were batch-mixed from linseed oil and dry pigments with white lead powder and had to be used immediately. So there was a great deal of variation. And they were satin when new, not matt.


 The Whippet I had in mind is going to be the British Army in Ireland version.  Yes, the irony of a green tank serving the enemy.



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Colonel

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I note that Vallejo paints has a green-yellow paint color.  Would that be correct, say, for a faded color?



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It's hard to know how paints of the era would have weathered. Pigments for khaki paint were earth pigments such a ground yellow clay with a little blue. We had no access to Chrome Oxide during the war, hence no strong greens and mostly khaki shades. Peacetime tanks would have been well looked-after, and for parades might have been wiped over with petrol to give a shine. On which subject, there were no truly matt paints in that era. They would have been satin finish from the linseed oil base.

Those sent to Ireland were probably repainted first after operational service, although a parade photo from Dublin shows Whippets still in their Western Front livery complete with the red and white recognition stripes which were entirely unnecessary in Ireland.

So I wouldn't worry too much about fading. If you think the Vallejo yellow-green you mention qualifies as a khaki, carry on. I would say you're looking for a brown-green rather than a yellow-green. And I still say that you can't go far wrong with something like the WW2 Khaki Green G3. That paint almost certainly used the same pigments as the WW1 version although perhaps in a different base medium and a different mix ratio.

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Peter Smith


Colonel

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Peter Smith wrote:

It's hard to know how paints of the era would have weathered. Pigments for khaki paint were earth pigments such a ground yellow clay with a little blue. We had no access to Chrome Oxide during the war, hence no strong greens and mostly khaki shades. Peacetime tanks would have been well looked-after, and for parades might have been wiped over with petrol to give a shine. On which subject, there were no truly matt paints in that era. They would have been satin finish from the linseed oil base.

Those sent to Ireland were probably repainted first after operational service, although a parade photo from Dublin shows Whippets still in their Western Front livery complete with the red and white recognition stripes which were entirely unnecessary in Ireland.

So I wouldn't worry too much about fading. If you think the Vallejo yellow-green you mention qualifies as a khaki, carry on. I would say you're looking for a brown-green rather than a yellow-green. And I still say that you can't go far wrong with something like the WW2 Khaki Green G3. That paint almost certainly used the same pigments as the WW1 version although perhaps in a different base medium and a different mix ratio.


 I happen to have a can of Goblin Green, which is a light green and probably the closest to a not-highly-faded green.  Maybe it's not period, but with so much ambiguity who knows.  Probably good enough for a parade though.



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