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Post Info TOPIC: Captured Turkish Gun i.d.


Legend

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Captured Turkish Gun i.d.
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Caption says it's a railway gun, but I don't think so.



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Legend

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It looks like an Armstrong RML gun from about 1860. I found a similar one (attached) in a book so old it didn't have photographs only lithographs.

Regards,

Charlie

 

Edit - Improved answer. It could be a 9inch 12-ton Armstrong RML Mark 1 from the 1860s. The later marks had fewer tubes in the barrel presumably because

steel making improved from 1860 onwards. There are a couple of surviving 9inch guns in Victoria.

(attachment) 

 

 



-- Edited by CharlieC on Monday 18th of May 2020 08:18:48 AM

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Legend

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Blimey. What a contraption. Does this throw any light on it? Could the Turks have had some at Gallipoli?



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Legend

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Probably - the Ottomans never threw anything away so probably kept the old guns around

There is a surviving 9inch Armstrong gun in Turkey - exhibited in the garden of Naval Museum in Beşiktaş in İstanbul.

The Handbook for the RML 9inch gun is online at: https://viewer.slv.vic.gov.au/?entity=IE5402758&mode=browse

There was also a similar looking RML 12inch 25 ton Mark I gun but I haven't found images of the Mark I version - the later Marks looked quite different.

Charlie

 



-- Edited by CharlieC on Monday 18th of May 2020 01:49:56 PM

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Legend

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Goodness me. It looks like something Albert Robida might have drawn.



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Legend

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For sure, the old Armstrong guns had a certain "presence" - look as though they would fit right into the steampunk anime about the town of artillerymen.

I think I've found a carriage similar to the one in the original image. This is an RML 11inch (underbored 12inch) 25-ton gun in Bermuda (attached - thanks to Wikipedia)

emplaced as a coastal defence gun.

The barrel seems to be a Mark II, the Mark I was a more complex construction like the 9inch Mark I.

The range of these guns was quite short - the 9inch max. range from the firing table was 6,000yds (5500m).

Charlie

Edit: Don't you hate it when you get a mental itch - couldn't remember the anime but it's the third story in "Memories" by Katsuhiro Otomo called "Cannon Fodder"



-- Edited by CharlieC on Tuesday 19th of May 2020 02:58:04 AM

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Corporal

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CharlieC, the lithograph posted in your first post (second in the thread) is the RML 12-inch 25 ton Mark I gun.  It's not quite a photograph, but it at least shows how the gun looked.

I recognized that lithograph from Alexander Lyman Holley's A Treatise on Ordnance and Armor, page 19:

https://www.google.com/books/edition/_/jx1ZbfEtWW8C?hl=en&gbpv=0

Since that book was written in 1865, the 12-inch RML is referred to as the 600-pounder, the 9-inch RML as the 300-pounder, the 8-inch RML as the 150-pounder, etc (also it has plenty of information on how the guns were made and their layouts).  They probably weren't finalized yet either, as those weights aren't the weights of the final shells adopted.

That was apparently how the guns were referred to back then, so searching "600-pounder Armstrong" or "RML 600-pounder" might get more images of a 12-inch 25 ton RML Mark I cannon.



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Legend

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Apparently 600 pounds (272 kg) was the projectile weight. The somewhat similar 1862 American Blakely gun of 12.75inch calibre fired

a 650 pound solid shot or a 450 pound explosive round. Man handling a round that heavy must have been a real effort remembering it had

to be inserted into the muzzle and studs on the shell engaged in the rifling then the shell pushed down the barrel on top of the propellant.

Google books often isn't usable outside the US but the book quoted is also in archive.org - https://archive.org/details/treatiseonordnan00holl

 

Regards,

Charlie

 

  



-- Edited by CharlieC on Wednesday 20th of May 2020 01:47:13 AM



-- Edited by CharlieC on Wednesday 20th of May 2020 01:48:45 AM

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Legend

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So if you had to write a caption for this picture, what would it be?



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Legend

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If we are agreed the gun is a 12inch Armstrong RML...

Perhaps

"British officers examine a Turkish Armstrong RML 12inch 25-ton gun from the 1860s in a coastal defence mounting after the Ottoman surrender in 1918"

 

Charlie

 



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Legend

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That will do me. May I present it to the Kansas City WWI Museum archive?



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Legend

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No problem

Charlie



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