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Post Info TOPIC: How were Mk. I-V tanks painted?


Sergeant

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How were Mk. I-V tanks painted?
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Hi, 

WWI noob here.

working on a Takom Mk.IV female and was wondering on painting practices.

- what did the painting process look like?

   was it Plate > Parkerizing  > Primer > Paint?

- How was the paint applied?

   was the Mk.IV brush or spray painted?

   I have seen pics of ladies hand painting the interior of a Mk.V .

- What colours were used?

  Parkerizing is grey/metallic (ish)

  what was the primer used red? grey? something else?

- what colours would the inner parts have been?

   Not the actual interior, but parts like the inner surface of the side assemblies (horns?), idler and drive sprocket.

 

I have looked at just about all the posts, but wasn't able to find any info on this.



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Commander in Chief

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Paintbrush, Large!


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Sergeant

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Well, that's that sorted! 😂😂😂

Guessing I'll use a flat brush and take my time...😉



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Legend

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Posts: 2008
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The instructions for painting artillery pieces at the time said nothing about primer or undercoats. I think it was expected that

the metal got a rub down, degrease then a solid coat of paint. Remember the paints of the time were white lead oxide stirred

into linseed oil with pigment added so they did a fair job at rust inhibition without the need for a primer. My impression is that leaded

paint was quite a bit thicker than the modern alkyd paints and the viscosity would have changed as the linseed oil started to polymerise in the

tin.

Also, no sprayguns, that's a later invention.

Charlie



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Sergeant

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Thanks for that info!

But that makes me wonder, what finish was given to the wheels, sprockets and idlers, the inner surface of the sponsons?



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Corporal

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Hi,
Although its probably true that WWI era vehicles were likely painted by brush, the airbrush was actually inveted in the late 1870s and used by some US railroad equipment manufacturers.

Pat

www.airbrushmuseum.com/index.html

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