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Post Info TOPIC: Late War German chemical warefare projects


Corporal

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Late War German chemical warefare projects
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Greetings everyone,

       One of my latest areas of interest is a number of topics concerning German chemical warfare projects near the end of the war.  I'm fascinated by obscure topics such as these.  Also, sorry if this is wrong forum section for this, miscellaneous seemed as good a place as any.

      To start with does anyone know if any Blue Cross agents besides Diphenlchloroarinse (Clark 1), Diphenylcyannoarsine (Clark 2) and ethyl/methyldichloroarsine were used/added to that list before the end of the war?   I found a few references to a agent called N-ethylcarbazole but cannot find any information on it's properties, date introduced etc.  Does anyone know anything about this agent, or any other little known or obscure Blue Cross agents?   And how much use of Blue Cross agents was there after the Spring/Summer 1918 German offensives?   My own research seems to conclude that after those offensives most gas production and use was concentrated on Mustard to slow down the Allied advance.  Can anyone vouch for this conclusion?  Any other little known or obscure info on Blue Cross Agents would also be appreciated as well.

     I read somewhere a long time ago that at the end of the war Germany was searching for a agent even more persistent than Mustard Gas.  Supposedly they came up with something that was based on Mustard but was much more spruced up so to speak.  Has anyone else heard of this before?

     Are there any know accounts ( I can't find any) of the Germans dropping chemical agents from areoplanes?  It seems likely that someone would have thought to use gas from airplanes, besides the British in their Plan 1919. 

     And lastly does anyone know if the Germans had any plans in terms of chemical weapons and their use in 1919.  What could have been has always been a persistent interest of mine haha.  Anyways,  thanks for reading.  I greatly appreciate any comments or info - even if it seems insignificant.

Thanks to all,

Gabe

 

 

 



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Sergeant

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Gabe wrote:

Greetings everyone,

       One of my latest areas of interest is a number of topics concerning German chemical warfare projects near the end of the war.  I'm fascinated by obscure topics such as these.  Also, sorry if this is wrong forum section for this, miscellaneous seemed as good a place as any.

      To start with does anyone know if any Blue Cross agents besides Diphenlchloroarinse (Clark 1), Diphenylcyannoarsine (Clark 2) and ethyl/methyldichloroarsine were used/added to that list before the end of the war?   I found a few references to a agent called N-ethylcarbazole but cannot find any information on it's properties, date introduced etc.  Does anyone know anything about this agent, or any other little known or obscure Blue Cross agents?   And how much use of Blue Cross agents was there after the Spring/Summer 1918 German offensives?   My own research seems to conclude that after those offensives most gas production and use was concentrated on Mustard to slow down the Allied advance.  Can anyone vouch for this conclusion?  Any other little known or obscure info on Blue Cross Agents would also be appreciated as well.

     I read somewhere a long time ago that at the end of the war Germany was searching for a agent even more persistent than Mustard Gas.  Supposedly they came up with something that was based on Mustard but was much more spruced up so to speak.  Has anyone else heard of this before?

     Are there any know accounts ( I can't find any) of the Germans dropping chemical agents from areoplanes?  It seems likely that someone would have thought to use gas from airplanes, besides the British in their Plan 1919. 

     And lastly does anyone know if the Germans had any plans in terms of chemical weapons and their use in 1919.  What could have been has always been a persistent interest of mine haha.  Anyways,  thanks for reading.  I greatly appreciate any comments or info - even if it seems insignificant.

Thanks to all,

Gabe

 Hi

Reference 'Blue Cross' , Albert Palazzo's 'Seeking Victory on the Western Front' p. 123-124, has the following:

ww1bluecross001.jpg

ww1bluecross002.jpg

So apparently a gas 'failure' on the part of the Germans.

I hope that is of use.

 

Mike

 


 



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Corporal

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Hey Mike,

     Thanks for sharing that.  I knew that is was considered something of a failure, but again I think they realized their error way to late.  I wonder if the soils of areas that blue cross was used still maintain traces of arsenic compounds - something to think about from a health standpoint.  Then again its had over 100 years to break down.

Anyways thanks for your input - I appreciate it!



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Commander in Chief

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digscholarship.unco.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi
P8
"The study by Meirvenne and colleagues found that “increased
amounts of arsenic,” which was used to make chemical weapons, were found in soils
surrounding World War I battlefields, particularly ammunition burning sites.23)

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