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Post Info TOPIC: Interesting Artefact


Major

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Interesting Artefact
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A friend of mine who collects mostly cricket memorabilia brought this article in the Antiques Trade Gazette to my attention:


To mark the extraordinary achievements of the highly skilled workforce at Fosterís, a series of plaques were made by the company and presented to both staff and suppliers. Among those in receipt was chief draughtsman William Rigby.


The vendor of the plaque recalled that 30 or 40 years ago Rigby had tried to give his notebooks and the tank plaque to the city council, but they had expressed little interest. Instead he had given them to her husband. Sadly the notebooks had been destroyed in a fire but the plaque had survived, still covered in an original factory blueprint of Mother.


Two years ago the rooms sold a similar tank plaque (although without the blueprint or provenance) to the Museum of Lincolnshire Life for around £500.Two commission bids left on the books started the bidding for this example at £300 and two bidders in the room pushed the price upwards. It finally sold to a Lincoln man for £600.


https://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f209/a7v/Antique.jpg



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Legend

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Aaargh, Rigby's notebooks were lost in a fire? Argh!


Nice to see the plaque, ta for posting that.


But the notebooks? Argh!



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Major

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I know . . . .


By the way, the BBC docudrama on The Battle of the Somme featured the 2nd Salford Pals (16th Bn, Lancashire Fusiliers) and their attack on Thiepval on July 1st. http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/entertainment/filmandtv/s/216/216826_supreme_sacrifice_of_somme.htmlMy Great-uncle Arthur was from Salford, but opted for the Manchester Regiment and ended up being taken prisoner in March 1918 for his trouble.


Anyway, the point is that the doco went on to show the Middlesex Regt. taking Thiepval on Sept 26th, with the help of 3 Tanks. There were a couple of brief shots of an extremely dodgy Mk. I mock-up. Didn't manage to video it, but I gather it's available on DVD.



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Captain

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I'd like to know what happened to the blueprints!  Where are they now???

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Legend

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Much depends on whether Fosters used the old draughting loft approach (developed for building wooden men o war but still in use in parts of the aircraft industry 1914-18). In this case drawings for all component parts were done full size, in chalk, on the floor of the draughting loft, working from the senior designers notes. Full size woodern patterns would then be made from these and used as templates in the construction , certainly of a wooden mock up and also in the prototype. Any full size drawings would be taken from the protoype once passed and blue prints in turn from the full sized drawing. Don't be taken in by the term 'in the blue print stage'. Blue prints are copies made from the original drawings. A better question is 'where there any full size drawings and if os what happened to them? Unfortunately they won't tel you any thing as much as the note books!

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Legend

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Centurion wrote:


Unfortunately they won't tel you any thing as much as the note books!

Absolutely, that's why I'm so gutted about their loss... There's so much about the developmental stages that may have been in there.

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