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Post Info TOPIC: Auto censorhip


Legend

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I've noticed that there seems to be a form of automated censorship of postings so that for example if one wishes to refer to the bit of the aircraft that the pilot sits in this piece of automated baudlerism changes ones text to ****pit  Come on now. The same thing happened to an earlier posting when  a word for a muddle and blunder came out as ****up (despite the fact that the original word comes from a 19 century naval expression for misaligned yards and rigging and actually has no sexual connotation at all). De we now have to refer to the pilot sitting in the male henspit? Are there any other words that we are not allowed to use?

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Legend

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The customary way round this sort of thing (as when sending profane emails to friends who work for companies with profanity filters - usually American firms, even in the UK) is to substitute numerals for letters, as in:


c0ckpit


c0ckup


And worse, much worse...



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Field Marshal

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I'm not at home right now, but when I get back, I'll check if the Forum has some sort of Profanity Filter switched on. And if it can be switched off. And if so I will do that. For the benefit of all you who are into c0ckpits and c0ckups.  

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/Peter Kempf


Legend

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Or c0ck-au-vin!

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Legend

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I'm spluttering into my c0ckoleekie soup but I feel we should c0ck a snook at such mechanisms and knock them into a c0cked hat. This should be done properly - no going off at half c0ck. Otherwise we could end up with a c0cktail of  odd spellings. Do we need to skrew up our courage or can we still write screw up?


It seems we can, how odd!



-- Edited by Centurion at 15:39, 2006-07-29

-- Edited by Centurion at 15:40, 2006-07-29

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Legend

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And what if any c0ckneys want to post, gorblimey guv'nor, strike a light, apples 'n' pears, and all that...?


And does the forum stop us mentioning S****horpe?


EDIT: Ha ha, yes it does! And for the non-Brits wondering what on earth I'm on about, I refer to the proud Northern town of


S c u n t h o r p e



-- Edited by Roger Todd at 17:21, 2006-07-29

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Field Marshal

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Roger Todd wrote:

And what if any c0ckneys want to post, gorblimey guv'nor, strike a light, apples 'n' pears, and all that...?


And does the forum stop us mentioning S****horpe?


EDIT: Ha ha, yes it does! And for the non-Brits wondering what on earth I'm on about, I refer to the proud Northern town of


S c u n t h o r p e



-- Edited by Roger Todd at 17:21, 2006-07-29




LMAO!

-- Edited by eugene at 17:59, 2006-07-29

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Field Marshal

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The Profanity Filter has now been turned off!


But no profanity cockups are allowed anyway...




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/Peter Kempf


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The Big Eye in the sky is watching


All the Best


Tim R



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Legend

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Off topic a bit but you might be interested in one very likely source of the phrase cock up. In the old days of the sailing navies the RN (and the young USN for all I know) had a phrase to describe when all the yards were set (but the sails not sheeted home) at exactly 90 degrees to the mast and also 90 degrees to the centre line of the ship (typically if in harbour or at anchor but ready to set sail if needed). This was cock a bill, if the yards were not cock a bill the 1st lieutenant would probably go a slight shade of purple and the crew might tremble ( but no self respecting crew would allow this situation to occur for fear of the derision of other ships companies). If a yard was out of alignment it was said to be cocked up. Now the French Navy in the Napoleonic Wars spent much of its time in port being blockaded, many of its seamen were conscripted into the French Army (who were always looking for men who had been trained to load and fire cannon) and replaced with raw recruits who had no sea experience. Confined to port with no sea time moral and abilities tended to flag a little and the appearance of some ships tended to deteriorate and the yards were not always properly aligned. The observing frigates and corvettes of the blockading fleet when 'looking in' to the French ports would often report that the French ships were 'all cocked up'. From this the phrase cock up to decribe any major muddle or error derived


In the same vein originally the phrase Sweet F A did not contain an anglo saxon 4 letter word begining with f but actually meant Sweet Fanny Adams. Fanny Adams was an unfortunate girl who was murdered by her sweetheart. He was a butcher and it was reported that he had tried to dispose of the body over the counter (probably a myth). About this time tinned foot was first being introduced to the RN in the form of corned beef. It was not popular and in grim humour the contents of the tins were said to be Sweet Fanny Adams. On enquiring of one's mess mates of what was available to eat the reply might be given ' nothing but Sweet Fanny Adams mate'



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Legend

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Centurion wrote:



In the same vein originally the phrase Sweet F A did not contain an anglo saxon 4 letter word begining with f but actually meant Sweet Fanny Adams. Fanny Adams was an unfortunate girl who was murdered by her sweetheart. He was a butcher and it was reported that he had tried to dispose of the body over the counter (probably a myth). About this time tinned foot was first being introduced to the RN in the form of corned beef. It was not popular and in grim humour the contents of the tins were said to be Sweet Fanny Adams. On enquiring of one's mess mates of what was available to eat the reply might be given ' nothing but Sweet Fanny Adams mate'




Close but the real story of Fanny Adams' death is more gruesome and more disturbing. I've attached a link to the article which describes the original Fanny Adams. The RN corned beef reference is spot on though.

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Legend

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Mark Hansen wrote:



Centurion wrote:



About this time tinned foot was first being introduced to the RN in the form of corned beef. It was not popular and in grim humour the contents of the tins were said to be Sweet Fanny Adams. On enquiring of one's mess mates of what was available to eat the reply might be given ' nothing but Sweet Fanny Adams mate'




Close but the real story of Fanny Adams' death is more gruesome and more disturbing. I've attached a link to the article which describes the original Fanny Adams. The RN corned beef reference is spot on though.



Except for the tinned foot! They are a barbaric lot in the RN!

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Legend

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Mark Hansen wrote:



Mark Hansen wrote:



Centurion wrote:



About this time tinned foot was first being introduced to the RN in the form of corned beef. It was not popular and in grim humour the contents of the tins were said to be Sweet Fanny Adams. On enquiring of one's mess mates of what was available to eat the reply might be given ' nothing but Sweet Fanny Adams mate'




Close but the real story of Fanny Adams' death is more gruesome and more disturbing. I've attached a link to the article which describes the original Fanny Adams. The RN corned beef reference is spot on though.



Except for the tinned foot! They are a barbaric lot in the RN!



Well it was corned beef

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